Blog

Week 16 – How To Stare Procrastination In The Face

Z Life is a Canvas

That’s why they invented paint brushes and crayons.  Go ahead and throw all the paint you can at your own life canvas and make it a true masterpiece!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
You’ve just received an invitation to an interview for your dream job. You’re excited and nervous. You make notes, pills review your resume, order try to anticipate questions from the job ad and prepare your answers. You jot down a few notes about your education, shop work experience, skills and maybe a few details about your hobbies and interests. You feeling confident as you go into the interview, until the dreaded question is asked. “Tell me about yourself.” You hum and sigh and show obvious discomfort in finding the right words to answer such a broad and open-ended question. You think to yourself, I’m blowing it, right out of the gate. The rest of the interview is a blur.

In many ways the question is not a fair one. It is way too broad, difficult to answer and almost impossible to rate. Many interviewers believe that this question will help the candidate relax when in fact it usually has the opposite effect. Here’s why. We are so much more than interviewers can ever see. They can get a glimpse of our personality through mannerisms, behaviours, words, expressions, and actions. But they can’t see our private thoughts, feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts. To try to express all of this in one simple answer is daunting at best.

There is hope. The best way to answer this question is to tell the interviews a short story about one of the most important goals you’ve achieved, either at work or in your life. A great tool to use in preparing for such a wide-opened question is the iceberg metaphor.

Level one – above the surface. Give an overview of your goal. Explain what you were trying to do, what actions you took and what results you achieved. This will give the interviewer a good sense of your abilities, commitment to carry it through and some indication about your potential.

Level two – just below the surface. Add details about any challenges you faced, the actions you took to solve the issues, how you applied creativity and made choices. This will show the interviewer how you took control of the situation to create the outcome your wanted.

Level three – deep below the surface. Interviewers hope that by asking this broad question they will get at the heart of the candidate. Use the opportunity to express more about yourself as you answer this question. Describe what your thought process was, how you felt, what motivated you to achieve this goal and what you learned about yourself. This will give them clues about what energizes and motivates you, and how you do your best work.

Taking time to prepare for this question is probably the best investment you can make. It is highly likely you will be asked this question many times in your career. Practice telling your story, until you have it down to 60-90 seconds. It will give you more control and confidence and you’ll nail the interview.

 
You just received an invitation to an interview for your dream job. You’re excited and nervous. You make notes, review your resume, ed try to anticipate questions from the job ad and prepare your answers. You jot down a few notes about your education, order work experience, skills and maybe a few details about your hobbies and interests. You feeling confident as you go into the interview, until the dreaded question is asked. “Tell me about yourself.” You hum and sigh and show obvious discomfort in finding the right words to answer such a broad and open-ended question. You think to yourself, I’m blowing it, right out of the gate. The rest of the interview is a blur.

In many ways the question is not a fair one. It is way too broad, difficult to answer and almost impossible to rate. Many interviewers believe that this question will help the candidate relax when in fact it usually has the opposite effect. Here’s why. We are so much more than interviewers can ever see. They can get a glimpse of our personality through mannerisms, behaviours, words, expressions, and actions. But they can’t see our private thoughts, feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts. To try to express all of this in one simple answer is daunting at best.

There is hope. The best way to answer this question is to tell the interviews a short story about one of the most important goals you’ve achieved, either at work or in your life. A great tool to use in preparing for such a wide-opened question is the iceberg metaphor.

Level one – above the surface. Give an overview of your goal. Explain what you were trying to do, what actions you took and what results you achieved. This will give the interviewer a good sense of your abilities, commitment to carry it through and some indication about your potential.

Level two – just below the surface. Add details about any challenges you faced, the actions you took to solve the issues, how you applied creativity and made choices. This will show the interviewer how you took control of the situation to create the outcome your wanted.

Level three – deep below the surface. Interviewers hope that by asking this broad question they will get at the heart of the candidate. Use the opportunity to express more about yourself as you answer this question. Describe what your thought process was, how you felt, what motivated you to achieve this goal and what you learned about yourself. This will give them clues about what energizes and motivates you, and how you do your best work.

Taking time to prepare for this question is probably the best investment you can make. It is highly likely you will be asked this question many times in your career. Practice telling your story, until you have it down to 60-90 seconds. It will give you more control and confidence and you’ll nail the interview.

 
Silence is not always golden. Holding back vital business information from employees, cialis especially when things are heading in the wrong direction, is usually the worst kept secret, and may keep you from finding the solutions that are critical to turn things around. Employees know when things aren’t going well.  They can see it and sense it from your behaviours or your language.  Be a courageous leader and let them know what’s going on, then, invite them to help you right the ship.  Send your employees a powerful message that “we’re all in this together”, one of the many great quotes from Steve Smith of the Red Green Show. You may not be able to fix your business’ financial issues with duct tape but you will go a long way in sending a powerful message to your employees that you need their help and value their contributions. At the end of the day, all employees want from their leaders is the truth; good, bad or ugly, so that they can do what needs to be done to keep the ship going in the right direction.
Silence is not always golden. Holding back vital business information from employees, pilule especially when things are heading in the wrong direction, adiposity is usually the worst kept secret, medications and may keep you from finding the solutions that are critical to turn things around. Employees know when things aren’t going well.  They can see it and sense it from your behaviours or your language.  Be a courageous leader and let them know what’s going on, then, invite them to help you right the ship.  Send your employees a powerful message that “we’re all in this together”, one of the many great quotes from Steve Smith of the Red Green Show. You may not be able to fix your business’ financial issues with duct tape but you will go a long way in sending a powerful message to your employees that you need their help and value their contributions. At the end of the day, all employees want from their leaders is the truth; good, bad or ugly, so that they can do what needs to be done to keep the ship going in the right direction.
Silence is not always golden. Holding back vital business information from employees, especially when things are heading in the wrong direction, is usually the worst kept secret, adiposity and may keep you from finding the solutions that are critical to turn things around. Employees know when things aren’t going well.  They can see it and sense it from your behaviours or your language.  Be a courageous leader and let them know what’s going on, then, invite them to help you right the ship.  Send your employees a powerful message that “we’re all in this together”, one of the many great quotes from Steve Smith of the Red Green Show. You may not be able to fix your business’ financial issues with duct tape but you will go a long way in sending a powerful message to your employees that you need their help and value their contributions. At the end of the day, all employees want from their leaders is the truth; good, bad or ugly, so that they can do what needs to be done to keep the ship going in the right direction.
Continuous learning is vital to business success, price but often confused as being synonymous with extravagant learning events and high dollar spend. The best learning happens when it relates to the job your employees are doing and connected to your industry. There are many easy ways to keep learning vibrant. One is to read and discuss articles that are related to your work environment. Another is to encourage your employees to identify five to ten things they would love to learn more about and make that part of their learning objectives. It could be looking for white papers or new articles about your industry, pills joining a webinar about a topic of interest, recipe taking an on-line course, or learning about another area of your business. With today’s access to information and free on-line learning resources, it is easier than ever to find quick ways to build on knowledge without having to spend significant resources. All you need to do is model the way by making continuous learning a part of your own development, and by creating a process for your employees to share what they learn with you and their colleagues. It will make learning meaningful and you won’t have to break the bank.

 

Dianne is a certified coach who is passionate about helping individuals and business leaders thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions.  She is the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information visit her website at www.inkiesta.com.

Fear is the single, order biggest obstacle preventing us from achieving our most cherished dreams and goals. What are we afraid of, exactly? Are we afraid we’ll succeed beyond our wildest dreams or that we’ll feel shameful in our greatest defeats? Fear is a great paradox. We fear the things we want the most, and at the same time, fear will always be a constant companion when we stretch ourselves and reach for our goals. It’s natural to feel fear. But when it gets in the way of what we most need to do, it becomes an obstacle. Fear comes in many disguises:

  • We make excuses to avoid doing or saying what we know we need to do or say.
  • We avoid doing what is necessary by distracting ourselves with mindless and meaningless activities, like surfing the net or watching TV.
  • We procrastinate and in the process harbour all the guilt that comes with knowing that we are holding back.
  • We deny, to ourselves and to others, the importance of what it is we must do.
  • We develop habits that serve to protect us from our fears, but do little for our peace of mind.

The danger of staying stuck in fear is that we will end up with an ocean of regrets and a litany of coulda, woulda, shouldas.  And we don’t want that. This week, take a few moments to name the fears you have about reaching your most important dreams and goals. Next week we’ll look at a process to overcome and move through those fears.
Fear is the single, sales biggest obstacle preventing us from achieving our most cherished dreams and goals. What are we afraid of, viagra buy exactly? Are we afraid we’ll succeed beyond our wildest dreams or that we’ll feel shameful in our greatest defeats? Fear is a great paradox. We fear the things we want the most, ed and at the same time, fear will always be a constant companion when we stretch ourselves and reach for our goals. It’s natural to feel fear. But when it gets in the way of what we most need to do, it becomes an obstacle. Fear comes in many disguises:

  • We make excuses to avoid doing or saying what we know we need to do or say.
  • We avoid doing what is necessary by distracting ourselves with mindless and meaningless activities, like surfing the net or watching TV.
  • We procrastinate and in the process harbour all the guilt that comes with knowing that we are holding back.
  • We deny, to ourselves and to others, the importance of what it is we must do.
  • We develop habits that serve to protect us from our fears, but do little for our peace of mind.

The danger of staying stuck in fear is that we will end up with an ocean of regrets and a litany of coulda, woulda, shouldas.  And we don’t want that. This week, take a few moments to name the fears you have about reaching your most important dreams and goals. Next week we’ll look at a process to overcome and move through those fears.
Poorly organized meetings are one of the biggest time wasters and sources of irritant for employees. If meetings aren’t addressing important issues, healing solving problems, developing or improving processes, conveying critical information or developing employees, leaders have to question the value of those meetings. Holding effective meetings may seem elementary, but the most basic of functions are often anything but simple. To deliver productive meetings, have a clear agenda and invite only those participants who are necessary to address the agenda. Provide information to the attendees prior to the meeting so that they can come prepared to discuss and contribute to the agenda. Keep minutes of the decisions that are made and use quick and easy communication vehicles to communicate those decisions to the rest of your team.  Your employees and colleagues will appreciate the efficiency of these meetings, waste less time and increase their own productivity. And you will be showing them how much you value their time.
Poorly organized meetings are one of the biggest time wasters and sources of irritant for employees. If meetings aren’t addressing important issues, medicine solving problems, developing or improving processes, conveying critical information or developing employees, leaders have to question the value of those meetings. Holding effective meetings may seem elementary, but the most basic of functions are often anything but simple. To deliver productive meetings, have a clear agenda and invite only those participants who are necessary to address the agenda. Provide information to the attendees prior to the meeting so that they can come prepared to discuss and contribute to the agenda. Keep minutes of the decisions that are made and use quick and easy communication vehicles to communicate those decisions to the rest of your team.  Your employees and colleagues will appreciate the efficiency of these meetings, waste less time and increase their own productivity. And you will be showing them how much you value their time.
Who can honestly say they have never procrastinated, viagra sale ever. Not many I suspect. We’re all guilty of avoiding the things we know we most need to do.  We avoid having difficult conversations, troche committing time and effort to an important goal, pharm exercising or making dietary changes.  When we’re faced with a difficult task, procrastination acts a safety valve to protect our feelings and keep our fears at bay. But when we procrastinate on the important things, they don’t go away.  The guilt stays with us and over time builds to a boiling point where it results in an erosion of confidence and well-being.  We may be able to fool others with the excuses we use, but we can’t fool ourselves.  Eventually the jig is up and we have to stare procrastination in the face.  The best way to confront it; you guessed it; is by taking small steps.

  1. Make note of what action you’re procrastinating about and why it’s important to take action.
  2. Visualize yourself doing what needs to get done and pay attention to the feelings that surface.  Once you know what feelings you will experience, you’ll be in a much better position to address them.
  3. Commit to working on the action, even if it’s only for 5-10 minutes.  If it’s a big task, break it down so you can work on it every day. For difficult conversations, plan out what you want to say.  Your notes will help you when you have the conversation.
  4. Recognize what you’ve accomplished and reward yourself for taking action.

Once you overcome procrastination, your confidence will soar, your fears will dissipate and you’ll be forever changed. And next time you find yourself procrastinating, you’ll have the tools to overcome it as well as any other challenges that may get in the way.

 

Dianne is a certified coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of incessant demands; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit the book page on this website. 
Who can honestly say they have never procrastinated, vcialis 40mg ever. Not many I suspect. We’re all guilty of avoiding the things we know we most need to do.  We avoid having difficult conversations, committing time and effort to an important goal, exercising or making dietary changes.  When we’re faced with a difficult task, procrastination acts a safety valve to protect our feelings and keep our fears at bay. But when we procrastinate on the important things, they don’t go away.  The guilt stays with us and over time builds to a boiling point where it results in an erosion of confidence and well-being.  We may be able to fool others with the excuses we use, but we can’t fool ourselves.  Eventually the jig is up and we have to stare procrastination in the face.  The best way to confront it; you guessed it; is by taking small steps.

  1. Make note of what action you’re procrastinating about and why it’s important to take action.
  2. Visualize yourself doing what needs to get done and pay attention to the feelings that surface.  Once you know what feelings you will experience, you’ll be in a much better position to address them.
  3. Commit to working on the action, even if it’s only for 5-10 minutes.  If it’s a big task, break it down so you can work on it every day. For difficult conversations, plan out what you want to say.  Your notes will help you when you have the conversation.
  4. Recognize what you’ve accomplished and reward yourself for taking action.

Once you overcome procrastination, your confidence will soar, your fears will dissipate and you’ll be forever changed. And next time you find yourself procrastinating, you’ll have the tools to overcome it as well as any other challenges that may get in the way.

 

Dianne is a certified coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of incessant demands; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit the book page on this website. 

Engagement Tip # 21 – Leaders, Be Brave and Tell Your Employees How Business Is Really Doing

Z Life is a Canvas

That’s why they invented paint brushes and crayons.  Go ahead and throw all the paint you can at your own life canvas and make it a true masterpiece!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
You’ve just received an invitation to an interview for your dream job. You’re excited and nervous. You make notes, pills review your resume, order try to anticipate questions from the job ad and prepare your answers. You jot down a few notes about your education, shop work experience, skills and maybe a few details about your hobbies and interests. You feeling confident as you go into the interview, until the dreaded question is asked. “Tell me about yourself.” You hum and sigh and show obvious discomfort in finding the right words to answer such a broad and open-ended question. You think to yourself, I’m blowing it, right out of the gate. The rest of the interview is a blur.

In many ways the question is not a fair one. It is way too broad, difficult to answer and almost impossible to rate. Many interviewers believe that this question will help the candidate relax when in fact it usually has the opposite effect. Here’s why. We are so much more than interviewers can ever see. They can get a glimpse of our personality through mannerisms, behaviours, words, expressions, and actions. But they can’t see our private thoughts, feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts. To try to express all of this in one simple answer is daunting at best.

There is hope. The best way to answer this question is to tell the interviews a short story about one of the most important goals you’ve achieved, either at work or in your life. A great tool to use in preparing for such a wide-opened question is the iceberg metaphor.

Level one – above the surface. Give an overview of your goal. Explain what you were trying to do, what actions you took and what results you achieved. This will give the interviewer a good sense of your abilities, commitment to carry it through and some indication about your potential.

Level two – just below the surface. Add details about any challenges you faced, the actions you took to solve the issues, how you applied creativity and made choices. This will show the interviewer how you took control of the situation to create the outcome your wanted.

Level three – deep below the surface. Interviewers hope that by asking this broad question they will get at the heart of the candidate. Use the opportunity to express more about yourself as you answer this question. Describe what your thought process was, how you felt, what motivated you to achieve this goal and what you learned about yourself. This will give them clues about what energizes and motivates you, and how you do your best work.

Taking time to prepare for this question is probably the best investment you can make. It is highly likely you will be asked this question many times in your career. Practice telling your story, until you have it down to 60-90 seconds. It will give you more control and confidence and you’ll nail the interview.

 
You just received an invitation to an interview for your dream job. You’re excited and nervous. You make notes, review your resume, ed try to anticipate questions from the job ad and prepare your answers. You jot down a few notes about your education, order work experience, skills and maybe a few details about your hobbies and interests. You feeling confident as you go into the interview, until the dreaded question is asked. “Tell me about yourself.” You hum and sigh and show obvious discomfort in finding the right words to answer such a broad and open-ended question. You think to yourself, I’m blowing it, right out of the gate. The rest of the interview is a blur.

In many ways the question is not a fair one. It is way too broad, difficult to answer and almost impossible to rate. Many interviewers believe that this question will help the candidate relax when in fact it usually has the opposite effect. Here’s why. We are so much more than interviewers can ever see. They can get a glimpse of our personality through mannerisms, behaviours, words, expressions, and actions. But they can’t see our private thoughts, feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts. To try to express all of this in one simple answer is daunting at best.

There is hope. The best way to answer this question is to tell the interviews a short story about one of the most important goals you’ve achieved, either at work or in your life. A great tool to use in preparing for such a wide-opened question is the iceberg metaphor.

Level one – above the surface. Give an overview of your goal. Explain what you were trying to do, what actions you took and what results you achieved. This will give the interviewer a good sense of your abilities, commitment to carry it through and some indication about your potential.

Level two – just below the surface. Add details about any challenges you faced, the actions you took to solve the issues, how you applied creativity and made choices. This will show the interviewer how you took control of the situation to create the outcome your wanted.

Level three – deep below the surface. Interviewers hope that by asking this broad question they will get at the heart of the candidate. Use the opportunity to express more about yourself as you answer this question. Describe what your thought process was, how you felt, what motivated you to achieve this goal and what you learned about yourself. This will give them clues about what energizes and motivates you, and how you do your best work.

Taking time to prepare for this question is probably the best investment you can make. It is highly likely you will be asked this question many times in your career. Practice telling your story, until you have it down to 60-90 seconds. It will give you more control and confidence and you’ll nail the interview.

 
Silence is not always golden. Holding back vital business information from employees, cialis especially when things are heading in the wrong direction, is usually the worst kept secret, and may keep you from finding the solutions that are critical to turn things around. Employees know when things aren’t going well.  They can see it and sense it from your behaviours or your language.  Be a courageous leader and let them know what’s going on, then, invite them to help you right the ship.  Send your employees a powerful message that “we’re all in this together”, one of the many great quotes from Steve Smith of the Red Green Show. You may not be able to fix your business’ financial issues with duct tape but you will go a long way in sending a powerful message to your employees that you need their help and value their contributions. At the end of the day, all employees want from their leaders is the truth; good, bad or ugly, so that they can do what needs to be done to keep the ship going in the right direction.

Continue Reading

Week 15 – How To Gain Mastery Over The Distractions In Your Life

It’s so easy to fall into the trap of traditional leadership views where only the leader has all the answers.  And how exhausting that must be for the leader. In the “busy-ness” of multiple priorities, case it may seem easier to tell employees what to do for the sake of expediency, instead of tapping into the genial ideas your employees have. But given the opportunity, employees will find innovative solutions to create easier ways of doing business; solve problems or increase productivity. Your employees are an immense resource just waiting for opportunities to engage in new and innovating ways to add value. Everyone benefits when leaders tap into those brilliant ideas and allow employees to lighten the load for everyone.
Now that you have a great goal to pursue, order one that is motivating and meaningful to you, pharmacy there are a few things you can do to guarantee you’ll achieve the success you want.  Like a garden, medicine a goal needs to be tended to if it is to flourish. The steps below will help you achieve the success you want.

  1. Weekly:  At the beginning of each week, take a few moments to make a list of all steps you will take over 5-7 days that week to accomplish one or two of the actions you have in your goal. Try to aim for 2-3 steps each day and keep in mind all the other life and work priorities you have, so that your calendar doesn’t get so full, it acts as a de-motivator. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get off track.  If weekends are too busy, you may not have time to work towards your goal on Saturdays and Sundays.
  2. Daily:  Add your 2-3 small steps to your daily planner. The act of writing down the steps in your planner is motivating, and because the steps are small, you’ll feel confident you can achieve them.  It is said that “a goal written down is a goal have done.” If the steps are in your planner, you are much more likely to make time to get these done.
  3. Nightly:  At the end of each day, take 5 minutes to review how you did.  If you were able all the steps you had planned to get done, congratulate yourself. Don’t worry that you miss a step here and there, just move it to the next day.

Too often we give up on goals because we feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work that is needed.  Worst, we feel guilty or inadequate when we fail to achieve the unachievable tasks we set out to do.  We fill our days with too many activities and berate ourselves for not getting all done. By breaking the actions from your goals into manageable steps, the likelihood of succeeding is much higher. You can do the same thing for all your other priorities. Forget the guilt when you have an off day and focus instead on what you did accomplish. Keep your eye on the ultimate prize which is the accomplishment of a meaningful goal and high value priorities that will enrich your life.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.  For more information, visit the other pages on the website.
Now that you have a great goal to pursue, order one that is motivating and meaningful to you, there are a few things you can do to guarantee you’ll achieve the success you want.  Like a garden, a goal needs to be tended to if it is to flourish. The steps below will help you achieve the success you want.

  1. Weekly:  At the beginning of each week, take a few moments to make a list of all steps you will take over 5-7 days that week to accomplish one or two of the actions you have in your goal. Try to aim for 2-3 steps each day and keep in mind all the other life and work priorities you have, so that your calendar doesn’t get so full, it acts as a de-motivator. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get off track.  If weekends are too busy, you may not have time to work towards your goal on Saturdays and Sundays.
  2. Daily:  Add your 2-3 small steps to your daily planner. The act of writing down the steps in your planner is motivating, and because the steps are small, you’ll feel confident you can achieve them.  It is said that “a goal written down is a goal have done.” If the steps are in your planner, you are much more likely to make time to get these done.
  3. Nightly:  At the end of each day, take 5 minutes to review how you did.  If you were able all the steps you had planned to get done, congratulate yourself. Don’t worry that you miss a step here and there, just move it to the next day.

Too often we give up on goals because we feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work that is needed.  Worst, we feel guilty or inadequate when we fail to achieve the unachievable tasks we set out to do.  We fill our days with too many activities and berate ourselves for not getting all done. By breaking the actions from your goals into manageable steps, the likelihood of succeeding is much higher. You can do the same thing for all your other priorities. Forget the guilt when you have an off day and focus instead on what you did accomplish. Keep your eye on the ultimate prize which is the accomplishment of a meaningful goal and high value priorities that will enrich your life.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.  For more information, visit the other pages on the website.
Most of the communication related to organizational changes continues to be delivered in a top-down mode. Leaders receive information from higher levels of the organization; pass it down to their employees and move on to the next task. With this style of communication it’s almost impossible for employees to engage with the new changes, viagra which often leads to unnecessary resistance. The main reason employees resist is that they have unanswered questions or they need time to process how the change fits with and impacts their work. Leaders can facilitate the process by creating feedback loops where employees can provide impressions, ask questions and clarify information to increase their understanding. Once they understand, vcialis 40mg employee will often provide input on how to adapt the change to their own work so they can adjust more quickly to the new reality. The feedback loop leads to continuous learning, early adoption and even process improvements. Everyone benefits.
Most of the communication related to organizational changes continues to be delivered in a top-down mode. Leaders receive information from higher levels of the organization; pass it down to their employees and move on to the next task. With this style of communication it’s almost impossible for employees to engage with the new changes, clinic which often leads to unnecessary resistance. The main reason employees resist is that they have unanswered questions or they need time to process how the change fits with and impacts their work. Leaders can facilitate the process by creating feedback loops where employees can provide impressions, check ask questions and clarify information to increase their understanding. Once they understand, employee will often provide input on how to adapt the change to their own work so they can adjust more quickly to the new reality. The feedback loop leads to continuous learning, early adoption and even process improvements. Everyone benefits.
The easy part is setting a goal.  Once it’s set, viagra sale we’re excited to get started and we go at it like there’s nothing else in the world.  Then reality hits, life gets in the way and the momentum stops.  Giving up is an option, but one that rarely feels good.  More often than not, the reasons we give up on a goal have more to do with time, the size of the goal and motivation for the goal.

  1. Time: Often we create great goals but forget to build in time each day to actually get them done.  We lead busy lives and it’s easy to lose track of our goals in the “busy-ness” of everyday priorities.
  2. Size: At the beginning of the year when we set New Year’s resolutions, we’re pretty motivated to do what needs to be done to achieve the resolution.  But we all know what happens a few weeks later.  Goals are the same way.  When they are too big or ambitious, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and to let them fizzle out.  To ensure success, break the goals down into steps that can be managed within the list of all other priorities that needs to get done.
  3. Motivation:  There are times when the motivation for the goal is not clear.  When that happens, the likelihood of giving up on the goal is much higher.  Motivation is the spicy part of a SWAG goal.  It is the intent and fundamental reason why you want to pursue a goal.  A goal is much more likely to get accomplished when intent and motivation are clear and the goals fits within the overall goals and dreams you have for your life.  If you find your motivation waning, take a look at the reason you set the goal and see if anything has changed.  If it has, it’s time to make adjustments to the goal.

Because goals need to be tended to, it’s important to make time each week to review your progress, identify any challenges and find way to either adjust the goal or make changes to help you stay on track.  Make sure you take in account all the other things that are happening in your life so that you can create steps that will fit rather than work against your other priorities.
The easy part is setting a goal.  Once it’s set, online we’re excited to get started and we go at it like there’s nothing else in the world.  Then reality hits, life gets in the way and the momentum stops.  Giving up is an option, but one that rarely feels good.  More often than not, the reasons we give up on a goal have more to do with time, the size of the goal and motivation for the goal.

  1. Time: Often we create great goals but forget to build in time each day to actually get them done.  We lead busy lives and it’s easy to lose track of our goals in the “busy-ness” of everyday priorities.
  2. Size: At the beginning of the year when we set New Year’s resolutions, we’re pretty motivated to do what needs to be done to achieve the resolution.  But we all know what happens a few weeks later.  Goals are the same way.  When they are too big or ambitious, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and to let them fizzle out.  To ensure success, break the goals down into steps that can be managed within the list of all other priorities that needs to get done.
  3. Motivation:  There are times when the motivation for the goal is not clear.  When that happens, the likelihood of giving up on the goal is much higher.  Motivation is the spicy part of a SWAG goal.  It is the intent and fundamental reason why you want to pursue a goal.  A goal is much more likely to get accomplished when intent and motivation are clear and the goals fits within the overall goals and dreams you have for your life.  If you find your motivation waning, take a look at the reason you set the goal and see if anything has changed.  If it has, it’s time to make adjustments to the goal.

Because goals need to be tended to, it’s important to make time each week to review your progress, identify any challenges and find way to either adjust the goal or make changes to help you stay on track.  Make sure you take in account all the other things that are happening in your life so that you can create steps that will fit rather than work against your other priorities.
Wait a minute! Leaders are supposed to give feedback to their employees, here not the other way around. This turns the concept of feedback on its head. There’s no doubt, viagra order it is a very uncomfortable notion for many leaders.  But having your employees give you constructive feedback is one of the most powerful ways to engage them and to develop as a leader. Leaders who are brave enough to ask their employees for feedback send a strong message of trust and mutual respect, not to mention a willingness to be vulnerable. When the employee and the leader are on equal footing, where titles don’t matter and meaningful conversation happens, you create incredible moments. So let your employees know that you want to grow as a leader and that they are in the best position to give you the feedback you need to continue to develop your leadership skills. It is a humbling experience, one that is rich and engaging for both the leader and the employee. It is the purest form of authentic leadership. 
It’s easy to become complacent in the face of routine and uninspiring tasks, buy which, sale in turn, prostate can lead to bad habits and lower productivity over time.  Routine often leads to boredom and kills creativity.  One way to ensure the creative juices will continue to flow abundantly is to keep learning and questioning.  Sharing tips, techniques and best practices about your industry and your work is a great way to spark new conversations that can lead to changes and ultimately lead to improvement and increased productivity. It also helps to change old perspectives and keep ideas fresh. Draw up a list of ideas from articles, blogs, news and journals. Task each employee to find out more information about the topic and ask one of your employees to present the information at your next team meeting. Make learning a standing agenda item and let your employees amaze you with the fresh and valuable information they bring to the table.  Not only will creativity soar, you’ll also have a built in learning process for yourself and your employees.
Life will get in the way of our goals. So will distractions. Guaranteed. Distractions come from any number of areas in our lives such as unexpected events with children, link unplanned meetings and other priorities that are as important as your goals. Distractions also come from TV, social media and all sorts of other non-important things. Sometimes, we even let ourselves get distracted on purpose, when the going gets rough. During those times it’s easy to lose sight of the end goal which is to achieve your most meaningful goals. But it doesn’t mean your efforts towards reaching those goals have to grind to a halt.  The key is to adjust your plan so you can focus on the right priorities. With a little more planning up front, you can adjust for the periods of your life when there are more things to do than there is time. For example, if you know that you will have to work extra hours at work over the next two weeks, you can adjust your activities to get what is most important done.  This may mean that the only activities you focus on in these two weeks are the ones that involve your children’s school priorities and a few steps towards your goals.  The other priorities can get shifted to when work calms down. We’re all jugglers of time and with a little bit more planning, we can keep focused on the right priorities without feeling overwhelmed or without giving up on our most important goals.  Here are a few tips to stay on track.

  • List all the priorities you have for work, family, your goals, etc.  Rank them in two buckets – the first bucket is your urgent and important priorities, the second bucket is not urgent and/or not important.  You may have to be ruthless in your decision about which bucket the activities goes in.
  • Make a list of activities to set aside during busy periods such as watching your favourite show (tape it) or some chores that can wait. This will help you reduce the stress that comes from feeling overwhelmed and lighten your load.
  • Take a few moments at the beginning of the week and add the urgent and important priorities into your planner.  Avoid adding them all into one day. Spread them out throughout the week. At the beginning of each day, review your planner to see what needs to get done that day and focus on those activities.  If there are any changes, make them.
  • If your week is extremely busy, break down the actions from your goals into even smaller steps. Even if you only get 3-5 small steps done, you’ll still feel like you’ve made progress.  You’re not going for quantity as much as consistent effort.
  • At the end of the week, take a few moments to see what you were able to accomplish and appreciate your efforts.  Take the activities that didn’t get done and move them into a time slot the following week.

When life gets too busy, focus on your priorities and get selfish with your time. That means saying no to things that are not priority, a challenge many face on a daily basis. Once the busy period passes, you can add less important activities into your week.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of busy lives; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit the her book page on this website. 

 

Engagement Tip # 20 – Seek Feedback On Your Leadership

We are all inspired by many things, a gorgeous sunrise or sunset, stunning beaches, the beauty in others, a great movie, beautiful music, quotes and roles models. They are important in our lives because they inspire us to be more than we can ever imagine on our own. They give us clues on what we should be doing and give us the courage to believe that what we want is possible. Where do you draw your inspiration from?

  1. What are your favourite books and why?
  2. What are your favourite quotes?
  3. What music moves your soul?
  4. What movies stir your emotions?
  5. Who are your role models, your heroes and heroines?
  6. What places inspire you?

Knowing where you draw your inspiration from can give you the courage you need to take the next step in your life.  And the best part is that they are always there to draw upon when you need inspiration.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
We are all inspired by many things, diagnosis a gorgeous sunrise or sunset, seek stunning beaches, the beauty in others, a great movie, beautiful music, quotes and roles models. They are important in our lives because they inspire us to be more than we can ever imagine on our own. They give us clues on what we should be doing and give us the courage to believe that what we want is possible. Where do you draw your inspiration from?

  1. What are your favourite books and why?
  2. What are your favourite quotes?
  3. What music moves your soul?
  4. What movies stir your emotions?
  5. Who are your role models, your heroes and heroines?
  6. What places inspire you?

Knowing where you draw your inspiration from can give you the courage you need to take the next step in your life.  And the best part is that they are always there to draw upon when you need inspiration.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
Congratulations on all the hard work you’ve done so far. I’m honoured that you’ve stayed with me until now and I hope that the exercises you did over the last few weeks have helped you to understand yourself a bit better.  This week I’m going to ask you to really stretch your imagination and think about what’s next in your life.  And I want you think about it from a perspective of: “In my wildest dreams…” Answer the questions below with what comes to mind and without any limitations or censoring.

  1. If time was infinite…
  2. If money was plentiful…
  3. My burning desire is…
  4. I want to…

Wasn’t this fun?  It is so rare that we give ourselves permission to think completely out of the box. We’re often too busy with multiple priorities that demand our attention. It is only by setting time aside to allow ourselves to dream, advice without limits, sildenafil that we can get at the core of what our soul wants us to know. This exercise is the beginning of what’s possible for the next part of your life’s journey.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
Congratulations on all the hard work you’ve done so far. I’m honoured that you’ve stayed with me until now and I hope that the exercises you did over the last few weeks have helped you to understand yourself a bit better.  This week I’m going to ask you to really stretch your imagination and think about what’s next in your life.  And I want you think about it from a perspective of: “In my wildest dreams…” Answer the questions below with what comes to mind and without any limitations or censoring.

  1. If time was infinite…
  2. If money was plentiful…
  3. My burning desire is…
  4. I want to…

Wasn’t this fun?  It is so rare that we give ourselves permission to think completely out of the box. We’re often too busy with multiple priorities that demand our attention. It is only by setting time aside to allow ourselves to dream, without limits, patient that we can get at the core of what our soul wants us to know. This exercise is the beginning of what’s possible for the next part of your life’s journey.
Congratulations on all the hard work you’ve done so far. I’m honoured that you’ve stayed with me until now and I hope that the exercises you did over the last few weeks have helped you to understand yourself a bit better.  This week I’m going to ask you to really stretch your imagination and think about what’s next in your life.  And I want you think about it from a perspective of: “In my wildest dreams…” Answer the questions below with what comes to mind and without any limitations or censoring.

  1. If time was infinite…
  2. If money was plentiful…
  3. My burning desire is…
  4. I want to…

Wasn’t this fun?  It is so rare that we give ourselves permission to think completely out of the box. We’re often too busy with multiple priorities that demand our attention. It is only by setting time aside to allow ourselves to dream, seek without limits, pharm that we can get at the core of what our soul wants us to know. This exercise is the beginning of what’s possible for the next part of your life’s journey.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
Wait a minute! Leaders are supposed to give feedback to their employees, adiposity not the other way around. This turns the concept of feedback on its head. There’s no doubt, it is a very uncomfortable notion for many leaders.  But having your employees give you constructive feedback is one of the most powerful ways to engage them and to develop as a leader. Leaders who are brave enough to ask their employees for feedback send a strong message of trust and mutual respect, not to mention a willingness to be vulnerable. When the employee and the leader are on equal footing, where titles don’t matter and meaningful conversation happens, you create incredible moments. So let your employees know that you want to grow as a leader and that they are in the best position to give you the feedback you need to continue to develop your leadership skills. It is a humbling experience, one that is rich and engaging for both the leader and the employee. It is the purest form of authentic leadership. 

Continue Reading

Week 14 – Maintaining Momentum

It’s so easy to fall into the trap of traditional leadership views where only the leader has all the answers.  And how exhausting that must be for the leader. In the “busy-ness” of multiple priorities, case it may seem easier to tell employees what to do for the sake of expediency, instead of tapping into the genial ideas your employees have. But given the opportunity, employees will find innovative solutions to create easier ways of doing business; solve problems or increase productivity. Your employees are an immense resource just waiting for opportunities to engage in new and innovating ways to add value. Everyone benefits when leaders tap into those brilliant ideas and allow employees to lighten the load for everyone.
Now that you have a great goal to pursue, order one that is motivating and meaningful to you, pharmacy there are a few things you can do to guarantee you’ll achieve the success you want.  Like a garden, medicine a goal needs to be tended to if it is to flourish. The steps below will help you achieve the success you want.

  1. Weekly:  At the beginning of each week, take a few moments to make a list of all steps you will take over 5-7 days that week to accomplish one or two of the actions you have in your goal. Try to aim for 2-3 steps each day and keep in mind all the other life and work priorities you have, so that your calendar doesn’t get so full, it acts as a de-motivator. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get off track.  If weekends are too busy, you may not have time to work towards your goal on Saturdays and Sundays.
  2. Daily:  Add your 2-3 small steps to your daily planner. The act of writing down the steps in your planner is motivating, and because the steps are small, you’ll feel confident you can achieve them.  It is said that “a goal written down is a goal have done.” If the steps are in your planner, you are much more likely to make time to get these done.
  3. Nightly:  At the end of each day, take 5 minutes to review how you did.  If you were able all the steps you had planned to get done, congratulate yourself. Don’t worry that you miss a step here and there, just move it to the next day.

Too often we give up on goals because we feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work that is needed.  Worst, we feel guilty or inadequate when we fail to achieve the unachievable tasks we set out to do.  We fill our days with too many activities and berate ourselves for not getting all done. By breaking the actions from your goals into manageable steps, the likelihood of succeeding is much higher. You can do the same thing for all your other priorities. Forget the guilt when you have an off day and focus instead on what you did accomplish. Keep your eye on the ultimate prize which is the accomplishment of a meaningful goal and high value priorities that will enrich your life.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.  For more information, visit the other pages on the website.
Now that you have a great goal to pursue, order one that is motivating and meaningful to you, there are a few things you can do to guarantee you’ll achieve the success you want.  Like a garden, a goal needs to be tended to if it is to flourish. The steps below will help you achieve the success you want.

  1. Weekly:  At the beginning of each week, take a few moments to make a list of all steps you will take over 5-7 days that week to accomplish one or two of the actions you have in your goal. Try to aim for 2-3 steps each day and keep in mind all the other life and work priorities you have, so that your calendar doesn’t get so full, it acts as a de-motivator. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get off track.  If weekends are too busy, you may not have time to work towards your goal on Saturdays and Sundays.
  2. Daily:  Add your 2-3 small steps to your daily planner. The act of writing down the steps in your planner is motivating, and because the steps are small, you’ll feel confident you can achieve them.  It is said that “a goal written down is a goal have done.” If the steps are in your planner, you are much more likely to make time to get these done.
  3. Nightly:  At the end of each day, take 5 minutes to review how you did.  If you were able all the steps you had planned to get done, congratulate yourself. Don’t worry that you miss a step here and there, just move it to the next day.

Too often we give up on goals because we feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work that is needed.  Worst, we feel guilty or inadequate when we fail to achieve the unachievable tasks we set out to do.  We fill our days with too many activities and berate ourselves for not getting all done. By breaking the actions from your goals into manageable steps, the likelihood of succeeding is much higher. You can do the same thing for all your other priorities. Forget the guilt when you have an off day and focus instead on what you did accomplish. Keep your eye on the ultimate prize which is the accomplishment of a meaningful goal and high value priorities that will enrich your life.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.  For more information, visit the other pages on the website.
Most of the communication related to organizational changes continues to be delivered in a top-down mode. Leaders receive information from higher levels of the organization; pass it down to their employees and move on to the next task. With this style of communication it’s almost impossible for employees to engage with the new changes, viagra which often leads to unnecessary resistance. The main reason employees resist is that they have unanswered questions or they need time to process how the change fits with and impacts their work. Leaders can facilitate the process by creating feedback loops where employees can provide impressions, ask questions and clarify information to increase their understanding. Once they understand, vcialis 40mg employee will often provide input on how to adapt the change to their own work so they can adjust more quickly to the new reality. The feedback loop leads to continuous learning, early adoption and even process improvements. Everyone benefits.
Most of the communication related to organizational changes continues to be delivered in a top-down mode. Leaders receive information from higher levels of the organization; pass it down to their employees and move on to the next task. With this style of communication it’s almost impossible for employees to engage with the new changes, clinic which often leads to unnecessary resistance. The main reason employees resist is that they have unanswered questions or they need time to process how the change fits with and impacts their work. Leaders can facilitate the process by creating feedback loops where employees can provide impressions, check ask questions and clarify information to increase their understanding. Once they understand, employee will often provide input on how to adapt the change to their own work so they can adjust more quickly to the new reality. The feedback loop leads to continuous learning, early adoption and even process improvements. Everyone benefits.
The easy part is setting a goal.  Once it’s set, viagra sale we’re excited to get started and we go at it like there’s nothing else in the world.  Then reality hits, life gets in the way and the momentum stops.  Giving up is an option, but one that rarely feels good.  More often than not, the reasons we give up on a goal have more to do with time, the size of the goal and motivation for the goal.

  1. Time: Often we create great goals but forget to build in time each day to actually get them done.  We lead busy lives and it’s easy to lose track of our goals in the “busy-ness” of everyday priorities.
  2. Size: At the beginning of the year when we set New Year’s resolutions, we’re pretty motivated to do what needs to be done to achieve the resolution.  But we all know what happens a few weeks later.  Goals are the same way.  When they are too big or ambitious, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and to let them fizzle out.  To ensure success, break the goals down into steps that can be managed within the list of all other priorities that needs to get done.
  3. Motivation:  There are times when the motivation for the goal is not clear.  When that happens, the likelihood of giving up on the goal is much higher.  Motivation is the spicy part of a SWAG goal.  It is the intent and fundamental reason why you want to pursue a goal.  A goal is much more likely to get accomplished when intent and motivation are clear and the goals fits within the overall goals and dreams you have for your life.  If you find your motivation waning, take a look at the reason you set the goal and see if anything has changed.  If it has, it’s time to make adjustments to the goal.

Because goals need to be tended to, it’s important to make time each week to review your progress, identify any challenges and find way to either adjust the goal or make changes to help you stay on track.  Make sure you take in account all the other things that are happening in your life so that you can create steps that will fit rather than work against your other priorities.

Engagement Tip # 19 – Let Your Employees’ Creativity Soar

It seems like the right thing to do to begin your hero’s journey with a brand new journal and a package of colourful pens and pencils. Think of your journal as a blank canvas to create your future self. The action of putting pen to paper is powerful and brings clarity to the jumbled thoughts that occupy the mind, and especially in this incessant, recipe on-demand world we live in. It lets your creativity flow uncensored and acts as a form of feedback analysis from you to you, like a mirror reflecting back. In this journal, you can pretend, without risks, try things on and dream big about what you picture yourself doing. You can dare yourself to admit, “Yes I can do this.” The act of making your ideas visible is the beginning of a promise to yourself to reach for your full potential. Select a journal that will inspire your best work. Make it elaborate or keep it simple. It’s yours to create, your own work of art.
It seems like the right thing to do to begin your hero’s journey with a brand new journal and a package of colourful pens and pencils. Think of your journal as a blank canvas to create your future self. The action of putting pen to paper is powerful and brings clarity to the jumbled thoughts that occupy the mind, buy cialis especially in this incessant, on-demand world we live in. It lets your creativity flow uncensored and acts as a form of feedback analysis from you to you, like a mirror reflecting back. In this journal, you can pretend, without risks, try things on and dream big about what you picture yourself doing. You can dare yourself to admit, “Yes I can do this.” The act of making your ideas visible is the beginning of a promise to yourself to reach for your full potential. Select a journal that will inspire your best work. Make it elaborate or keep it simple. It’s yours to create, your own work of art.
It’s so easy to fall into the trap of traditional leadership views where only the leader has all the answers.  And how exhausting that must be for the leader. In the “busy-ness” of multiple priorities, sildenafil it may seem easier to tell employees what to do for the sake of expediency, instead of tapping into the genial ideas your employees have. But given the opportunity, employees will find innovative solutions to create easier ways of doing business; solve problems or increase productivity. Your employees are an immense resource just waiting for opportunities to engage in new and innovating ways to add value. Everyone benefits when leaders tap into those brilliant ideas and allow employees to lighten the load for everyone.

Continue Reading

Week 13 – Setting Goals Up For Success

It’s so easy to fall into the trap of traditional leadership views where only the leader has all the answers.  And how exhausting that must be for the leader. In the “busy-ness” of multiple priorities, case it may seem easier to tell employees what to do for the sake of expediency, instead of tapping into the genial ideas your employees have. But given the opportunity, employees will find innovative solutions to create easier ways of doing business; solve problems or increase productivity. Your employees are an immense resource just waiting for opportunities to engage in new and innovating ways to add value. Everyone benefits when leaders tap into those brilliant ideas and allow employees to lighten the load for everyone.
Now that you have a great goal to pursue, order one that is motivating and meaningful to you, pharmacy there are a few things you can do to guarantee you’ll achieve the success you want.  Like a garden, medicine a goal needs to be tended to if it is to flourish. The steps below will help you achieve the success you want.

  1. Weekly:  At the beginning of each week, take a few moments to make a list of all steps you will take over 5-7 days that week to accomplish one or two of the actions you have in your goal. Try to aim for 2-3 steps each day and keep in mind all the other life and work priorities you have, so that your calendar doesn’t get so full, it acts as a de-motivator. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get off track.  If weekends are too busy, you may not have time to work towards your goal on Saturdays and Sundays.
  2. Daily:  Add your 2-3 small steps to your daily planner. The act of writing down the steps in your planner is motivating, and because the steps are small, you’ll feel confident you can achieve them.  It is said that “a goal written down is a goal have done.” If the steps are in your planner, you are much more likely to make time to get these done.
  3. Nightly:  At the end of each day, take 5 minutes to review how you did.  If you were able all the steps you had planned to get done, congratulate yourself. Don’t worry that you miss a step here and there, just move it to the next day.

Too often we give up on goals because we feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work that is needed.  Worst, we feel guilty or inadequate when we fail to achieve the unachievable tasks we set out to do.  We fill our days with too many activities and berate ourselves for not getting all done. By breaking the actions from your goals into manageable steps, the likelihood of succeeding is much higher. You can do the same thing for all your other priorities. Forget the guilt when you have an off day and focus instead on what you did accomplish. Keep your eye on the ultimate prize which is the accomplishment of a meaningful goal and high value priorities that will enrich your life.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.  For more information, visit the other pages on the website.

Engagement Tip #18 – Become a Mentor

Mark Victor Hanson. Co-creator of Chicken Soup for The Soul, online once said: “By recording your dreams and goals on paper, you set in motion the process of becoming the person you must want to be. Put your future in good hands, your own.” Last week you focused on creating a bucket list of possibilities for your life and work.  But a list is just a list, unless it gets converted into specific goals with target dates. This week, use your reflection time to categorize you bucket list into goals with general timelines. Don’t worry about creating detailed actions to bring those goals to reality.  At this point you are just trying to get your list of goals into general timelines that feel right. Next week, we’ll work on creating more detailed goals that include actions, timelines and outcomes.

  1.  Think Big: In 10 years I am accomplishing…
  2. Think Mid-Term: In 5 years I am accomplishing…
  3. Think Short-term: In 2-3 years I am accomplishing…
  4. Think Right Now: In the next 6-12 months, I am accomplishing…  (1-2 big goals maximum, 3-5 small goals)

 

Dianne is a business and life coach who helps clients thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions.  She is the author of: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. 
Mark Victor Hanson. Co-creator of Chicken Soup for The Soul, search once said: “By recording your dreams and goals on paper, drug you set in motion the process of becoming the person you must want to be. Put your future in good hands, your own.” Last week you focused on creating a bucket list of possibilities for your life and work.  But a list is just a list, unless it gets converted into specific goals with target dates. This week, use your reflection time to categorize you bucket list into goals with general timelines. Don’t worry about creating detailed actions to bring those goals to reality.  At this point you are just trying to get your list of goals into general timelines that feel right. Next week, we’ll work on creating more detailed goals that include actions, timelines and outcomes.

  1.  Think Big: In 10 years I am accomplishing…
  2. Think Mid-Term: In 5 years I am accomplishing…
  3. Think Short-term: In 2-3 years I am accomplishing…
  4. Think Right Now: In the next 6-12 months, I am accomplishing…  (1-2 big goals maximum, 3-5 small goals)

 

Dianne is a business and life coach who helps clients thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions.  She is the author of: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. 
Leadership is about mentoring and coaching, remedy not telling.  The essence of creating a strong bond with employees is using those teachable moments where you and your employee can engage in meaningful dialogue that leads to new insights and better ways to perform, adiposity for both.  It is an extremely humbling experience to coach someone and a role that is often ignored.  While in coaching mode, a leader gets to walk the talk and help the employee grow.  It’s a two-way process that allows employees to ask questions, process information, figure out what’s not working and find ways to resolve issues and address gaps. A coaching relationship calls for both the employee and the leader to show their vulnerabilities and to share their experiences so they can both be enriched by the experience.  In a coaching environment, leaders have an opportunity to help their employees grow in a supportive and caring environment.
Leadership is about mentoring and coaching, remedy not telling.  The essence of creating a strong bond with employees is using those teachable moments where you and your employee can engage in meaningful dialogue that leads to new insights and better ways to perform, tadalafil for both.  It is an extremely humbling experience to coach someone and a role that is often ignored.  While in coaching mode, adiposity a leader gets to walk the talk and help the employee grow.  It’s a two-way process that allows employees to ask questions, process information, figure out what’s not working and find ways to resolve issues and address gaps. A coaching relationship calls for both the employee and the leader to show their vulnerabilities and to share their experiences so they can both be enriched by the experience.  In a coaching environment, leaders have an opportunity to help their employees grow in a supportive and caring environment.
When she was honoured during the 2006 US Tennis Open Championship, pharm Billie Jean King, erectile a professional tennis player, told the crowd that when she was just five years old, she boldly announced to her mother she was going to do something important with her life.  With determination she created the possibilities needed to accomplish her goals. In the process became a role model for many women in professional tennis.

Goals allow you to concretely see what’s possible in the future and to bring that vision to life.  Goals bring focus to your dreams and aspirations so that you can turn them into tangible outcomes.  They turn potential into performance and are essential to your well-being.  This approach that I call S.W.A.G. is proven to have a high success rate.  SWAG goals have four very important components that increase the likelihood of success.

  1.  Spicy goals have intent” and “motivation” that create a strong desire to do something.
  2. Winning goals have a clear outcomes and are measurable.  They identify the resources you need to achieve the outcomes you want.
  3. Aspiring goals have realistic and achievable actions that provide a roadmap and help you to stay on track.  The actions must be flexible enough to adjust when obstacle gets in the way.
  4. Goals include a commitment you make to yourself by establishing timelines and sequencing to ensure success.

I invite you this week is to select one of the important goals that you’ve identified and to develop it into a SWAG goal.  And be sure to build in celebrations as you reach important milestone moment towards this goal.  You can use this format to create inspired goals.

  1.  I am…  so that
  2. My goal is accomplished when…
  3. I need these resources to accomplish this goal.
  4. I am taking these actions…
  5. I will take these actions by…
  6. I will celebrate by…

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information or to sign up for her newsletter, visit www.inkiesta.com
When she was honoured during the 2006 US Tennis Open Championship, Billie Jean King, order a professional tennis player, told the crowd that when she was just five years old, she boldly announced to her mother she was going to do something important with her life.  With determination she created the possibilities needed to accomplish her goals. In the process became a role model for many women in professional tennis.

Goals allow you to concretely see what’s possible in the future and to bring that vision to life.  Goals bring focus to your dreams and aspirations so that you can turn them into tangible outcomes.  They turn potential into performance and are essential to your well-being.  This approach that I call S.W.A.G. is proven to have a high success rate.  SWAG goals have four very important components that increase the likelihood of success.

  1.  Spicy goals have intent” and “motivation” that create a strong desire to do something.
  2. Winning goals have clear outcomes and are measurable.  They identify the resources you need to achieve the outcomes you want.
  3. Aspiring goals have realistic and achievable actions that provide a roadmap and help you to stay on track.  The actions must be flexible enough to adjust when obstacle gets in the way.
  4. Goals include a commitment you make to yourself by establishing timelines and sequencing to ensure success.

I invite you this week is to select one of the important goals that you’ve identified and to develop it into a SWAG goal.  And be sure to build in celebrations as you reach important milestone moment towards this goal.  You can use this format to create inspired goals.

  1.  I am…  so that
  2. My goal is accomplished when…
  3. I need these resources to accomplish this goal.
  4. I am taking these actions…
  5. I will take these actions by…
  6. I will celebrate by…

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information or to sign up for her newsletter, visit www.inkiesta.com
Each employee brings his or her own unique set of skills and strengths to the work they do. For example, order Sam may be your go-to person whenever you implement new systems because he loves to learn about new technologies and figure out how to use them to their full advantage. Everyone goes to Sam when they have technology issues. Julie may be your best problem-solver and loves a new challenge. Strengths are deeply rooted in the passions your employees have and they look for any opportunity to use those strengths. When employees can use their strengths, they make light of the work that must be done, even when the tasks are less appealing. Stress levels decrease and enjoyment increases. The best strategy then, is to identify the key strengths required to build a complimentary team; learn the strengths of each employee within the team, and leverage those strengths for the benefit of the team and the entire organization. If there are gaps, you can look to fill those when you select your next candidate. When focus is placed on leveraging strengths instead of weaknesses, employees perform at their best, surpass productivity expectations, and engagement levels soar.
Each employee brings his or her own unique set of skills and strengths to the work they do. For example, stuff Sam may be your go-to person whenever you implement new systems because he loves to learn about new technologies and figure out how to use them to their full advantage. Everyone goes to Sam when they have technology issues. Julie may be your best problem-solver and loves a new challenge. Strengths are deeply rooted in the passions your employees have and they look for any opportunity to use those strengths. When employees can use their strengths, troche they make light of the work that must be done, even when the tasks are less appealing. Stress levels decrease and enjoyment increases. The best strategy then, is to identify the key strengths required to build a complimentary team; learn the strengths of each employee within the team, and leverage those strengths for the benefit of the team and the entire organization. If there are gaps, you can look to fill those when you select your next candidate. When focus is placed on leveraging strengths instead of weaknesses, employees perform at their best, surpass productivity expectations, and engagement levels soar.
Employees are hungry to learn and to grow their talents. One way to help them is to provide opportunities for mentoring.  A mentoring relationship is a two way conversation that allows employees to “pick the brain” of someone they know and trust, to ask the questions they may not ask their leaders and to learn from the person who is mentoring them because that person has already been in the role the employee aspires to doing. It works well for employees who are preparing for more responsibility and need exposure to others who have been in those roles. Mentoring can happen within your team, within your organization or outside your organization. It doesn’t need to be a formal program with complex processes. All that is needed is a quick guide on how to get the most out of mentoring experience. Organic mentoring where employees choose and approach the people they want to be mentored by works best. Mentoring relationships are valuable, whether they are done through a few high quality meetings or over a longer period of time. Encourage your employees to seek out and meet with mentors and watch them engage in the process. Become a mentor yourself and see how enriching the experience can be.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information or to sign up for her newsletter, visit www.inkiesta.com

Continue Reading

Week 12 – Creating Goals That Have S.W.A.G

If-There-Are-No-Limits-lg

Available at:

                        www.chapters.ca

                         www.amazon.ca

                       www.amazon.com

                  www.friesenpress.com

 

There’s no question, we’ve lost our way in a perfect storm created by an incessant, 24/7, on-demand world with too many choices and misguided beliefs that we can have it all. Essentially written to be your own personal coach in a book, each chapter is filled with powerful questions, exercises and guided reflections to help you regain balance and refocus your energies on your most important dreams and goals in twelve different aspects of your life. Inspirational stories and a pragmatic approach help you create a holistic life plan that is infused with logic, a healthy dose of intuition and the emotions of a contemplative heart. You’re invited to make positive changes from a perspective of no limits and to respond in your own unique way to the incessant demands that keep getting in your way. It is the perfect book if you:

  • are ready to chart a new course in your life
  • want to take a positive steps to achieve the success your want
  • are looking for balance and meaning in a sea of relentless noise
  • are at a milestone in your life (e.g. starting a new life, new career, retirement)
  • feel overwhelmed by too many choices and incessant demands
  • want to become an exemplary leader in your personal and professional life
  • want to creating an incredible legacies for those you love

 

In general, treat leaders dislike performance reviews for three key reasons.

  1. Performance review programs are often too complex and miss the most important point which is two way feedback. It’s too easy to get wrapped up in the scoring and spend energy trying to decide if employees deserve a 3.5 out of 5 or a 3.6.  These systems force leaders to put employees in boxes or on a curve.
  2. Performance reviews are often assessed against the last few weeks or months of contribution. What happened 6 months ago is usually long forgotten by the time performance reviews are done and this diminishes the value of the feedback.
  3. Most leaders would rather avoid the difficult conversations about performance, period. Who wants to be the bearer of bad news?

Instead of focusing on formal performance reviews, why not get into the habit of holding short one-on-one meetings with your employees, once or twice a month, to discuss how they are doing and to provide the opportunity for them to give you feedback.  Make it a true two-way dialogue.  Keep notes. Address performance issues before they get out of control.  Make it easier on yourself and your employees when formal performance review time rolls around. You’ll both benefit from exchanging more information and have a complete picture of performance.  Employees will feel more engage as a result.

 

 
In general, dosage leaders dislike performance reviews for three key reasons.

  1. Performance review programs are often too complex and miss the most important point which is two way feedback. It’s too easy to get wrapped up in the scoring and spend energy trying to decide if employees deserve a 3.5 out of 5 or a 3.6.  These systems force leaders to put employees in boxes or on a curve.
  2. Performance reviews are often assessed against the last few weeks or months of contribution. What happened 6 months ago is usually long forgotten by the time performance reviews are done and this diminishes the value of the feedback.
  3. Most leaders would rather avoid the difficult conversations about performance, period. Who wants to be the bearer of bad news?

Instead of focusing on formal performance reviews, why not get into the habit of holding short one-on-one meetings with your employees, once or twice a month, to discuss how they are doing and to provide the opportunity for them to give you feedback.  Make it a true two-way dialogue.  Keep notes. Address performance issues before they get out of control.  Make it easier on yourself and your employees when formal performance review time rolls around. You’ll both benefit from exchanging more information and have a complete picture of performance.  Employees will feel more engage as a result.

 

 
In general, click leaders dislike performance reviews for three key reasons.

  1. Performance review programs are often too complex and miss the most important point which is two way feedback. It’s too easy to get wrapped up in the scoring and spend energy trying to decide if employees deserve a 3.5 out of 5 or a 3.6.  These systems force leaders to put employees in boxes or on a curve.
  2. Performance reviews are often assessed against the last few weeks or months of contribution. What happened 6 months ago is usually long forgotten by the time performance reviews are done and this diminishes the value of the feedback.
  3. Most leaders would rather avoid the difficult conversations about performance, stuff period. Who wants to be the bearer of bad news?

Instead of focusing on formal performance reviews, view why not get into the habit of holding short one-on-one meetings with your employees, once or twice a month, to discuss how they are doing and to provide the opportunity for them to give you feedback.  Make it a true two-way dialogue.  Keep notes. Address performance issues before they get out of control.  Make it easier on yourself and your employees when formal performance review time rolls around. You’ll both benefit from exchanging more information and have a complete picture of performance.  Employees will feel more engage as a result.

 

 
When she was honoured during the 2006 US Tennis Open Championship, viagra buy Billie Jean King, troche a professional tennis player, told the crowd that when she was just five years old, she boldly announced to her mother she was going to do something important with her life.  With determination she created the possibilities needed to accomplish her goals. In the process became a role model for many women in professional tennis.

Goals allow you to concretely see what’s possible in the future and to bring that vision to life.  Goals bring focus to your dreams and aspirations so that you can turn them into tangible outcomes.  They turn potential into performance and are essential to your well-being.  This approach that I call S.W.A.G. is proven to have a high success rate.  SWAG goals have four very important components that increase the likelihood of success.

  1.  Spicy goals have intent” and “motivation” that create a strong desire to do something.
  2. Winning goals have clear outcomes and are measurable.  They identify the resources you need to achieve the outcomes you want.
  3. Aspiring goals have realistic and achievable actions that provide a roadmap and help you to stay on track.  The actions must be flexible enough to adjust when obstacle gets in the way.
  4. Goals include a commitment you make to yourself by establishing timelines and sequencing to ensure success.

I invite you this week is to select one of the important goals that you’ve identified and to develop it into a SWAG goal.  And be sure to build in celebrations as you reach important milestone moment towards this goal.  You can use this format to create inspired goals.

  1.  I am…  so that
  2. My goal is accomplished when…
  3. I need these resources to accomplish this goal.
  4. I am taking these actions…
  5. I will take these actions by…
  6. I will celebrate by…

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information or to sign up for her newsletter, visit www.inkiesta.com

Engagement Tip # 17 – Coach and Watch Them Grow

Mark Victor Hanson. Co-creator of Chicken Soup for The Soul, online once said: “By recording your dreams and goals on paper, you set in motion the process of becoming the person you must want to be. Put your future in good hands, your own.” Last week you focused on creating a bucket list of possibilities for your life and work.  But a list is just a list, unless it gets converted into specific goals with target dates. This week, use your reflection time to categorize you bucket list into goals with general timelines. Don’t worry about creating detailed actions to bring those goals to reality.  At this point you are just trying to get your list of goals into general timelines that feel right. Next week, we’ll work on creating more detailed goals that include actions, timelines and outcomes.

  1.  Think Big: In 10 years I am accomplishing…
  2. Think Mid-Term: In 5 years I am accomplishing…
  3. Think Short-term: In 2-3 years I am accomplishing…
  4. Think Right Now: In the next 6-12 months, I am accomplishing…  (1-2 big goals maximum, 3-5 small goals)

 

Dianne is a business and life coach who helps clients thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions.  She is the author of: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. 
Mark Victor Hanson. Co-creator of Chicken Soup for The Soul, search once said: “By recording your dreams and goals on paper, drug you set in motion the process of becoming the person you must want to be. Put your future in good hands, your own.” Last week you focused on creating a bucket list of possibilities for your life and work.  But a list is just a list, unless it gets converted into specific goals with target dates. This week, use your reflection time to categorize you bucket list into goals with general timelines. Don’t worry about creating detailed actions to bring those goals to reality.  At this point you are just trying to get your list of goals into general timelines that feel right. Next week, we’ll work on creating more detailed goals that include actions, timelines and outcomes.

  1.  Think Big: In 10 years I am accomplishing…
  2. Think Mid-Term: In 5 years I am accomplishing…
  3. Think Short-term: In 2-3 years I am accomplishing…
  4. Think Right Now: In the next 6-12 months, I am accomplishing…  (1-2 big goals maximum, 3-5 small goals)

 

Dianne is a business and life coach who helps clients thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions.  She is the author of: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. 
Leadership is about mentoring and coaching, remedy not telling.  The essence of creating a strong bond with employees is using those teachable moments where you and your employee can engage in meaningful dialogue that leads to new insights and better ways to perform, adiposity for both.  It is an extremely humbling experience to coach someone and a role that is often ignored.  While in coaching mode, a leader gets to walk the talk and help the employee grow.  It’s a two-way process that allows employees to ask questions, process information, figure out what’s not working and find ways to resolve issues and address gaps. A coaching relationship calls for both the employee and the leader to show their vulnerabilities and to share their experiences so they can both be enriched by the experience.  In a coaching environment, leaders have an opportunity to help their employees grow in a supportive and caring environment.

Continue Reading

Week 11 – Think Big

Mark Victor Hanson. Co-creator of Chicken Soup for The Soul, online once said: “By recording your dreams and goals on paper, you set in motion the process of becoming the person you must want to be. Put your future in good hands, your own.” Last week you focused on creating a bucket list of possibilities for your life and work.  But a list is just a list, unless it gets converted into specific goals with target dates. This week, use your reflection time to categorize you bucket list into goals with general timelines. Don’t worry about creating detailed actions to bring those goals to reality.  At this point you are just trying to get your list of goals into general timelines that feel right. Next week, we’ll work on creating more detailed goals that include actions, timelines and outcomes.

  1.  Think Big: In 10 years I am accomplishing…
  2. Think Mid-Term: In 5 years I am accomplishing…
  3. Think Short-term: In 2-3 years I am accomplishing…
  4. Think Right Now: In the next 6-12 months, I am accomplishing…  (1-2 big goals maximum, 3-5 small goals)

 

Dianne is a business and life coach who helps clients thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions.  She is the author of: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. 

Engagement Tip # 16 – How To Link Feedback and Engagement

If-There-Are-No-Limits-lg

Available at:

                        www.chapters.ca

                         www.amazon.ca

                       www.amazon.com

                  www.friesenpress.com

 

There’s no question, we’ve lost our way in a perfect storm created by an incessant, 24/7, on-demand world with too many choices and misguided beliefs that we can have it all. Essentially written to be your own personal coach in a book, each chapter is filled with powerful questions, exercises and guided reflections to help you regain balance and refocus your energies on your most important dreams and goals in twelve different aspects of your life. Inspirational stories and a pragmatic approach help you create a holistic life plan that is infused with logic, a healthy dose of intuition and the emotions of a contemplative heart. You’re invited to make positive changes from a perspective of no limits and to respond in your own unique way to the incessant demands that keep getting in your way. It is the perfect book if you:

  • are ready to chart a new course in your life
  • want to take a positive steps to achieve the success your want
  • are looking for balance and meaning in a sea of relentless noise
  • are at a milestone in your life (e.g. starting a new life, new career, retirement)
  • feel overwhelmed by too many choices and incessant demands
  • want to become an exemplary leader in your personal and professional life
  • want to creating an incredible legacies for those you love

 

In general, treat leaders dislike performance reviews for three key reasons.

  1. Performance review programs are often too complex and miss the most important point which is two way feedback. It’s too easy to get wrapped up in the scoring and spend energy trying to decide if employees deserve a 3.5 out of 5 or a 3.6.  These systems force leaders to put employees in boxes or on a curve.
  2. Performance reviews are often assessed against the last few weeks or months of contribution. What happened 6 months ago is usually long forgotten by the time performance reviews are done and this diminishes the value of the feedback.
  3. Most leaders would rather avoid the difficult conversations about performance, period. Who wants to be the bearer of bad news?

Instead of focusing on formal performance reviews, why not get into the habit of holding short one-on-one meetings with your employees, once or twice a month, to discuss how they are doing and to provide the opportunity for them to give you feedback.  Make it a true two-way dialogue.  Keep notes. Address performance issues before they get out of control.  Make it easier on yourself and your employees when formal performance review time rolls around. You’ll both benefit from exchanging more information and have a complete picture of performance.  Employees will feel more engage as a result.

 

 

Continue Reading

Week 10 – Finding Precious Time

The exercises you’ve done until now have likely highlighted a few areas of your life that need attention. These areas can form part of the goals you add to your bucket list. This week I invite you to think about what you really want in different aspects of your life. Forget what you need. As Author Thomas Moore says: “Admit to what you desire and what you fear… It’s all right to have grand and eccentric longings. It’s all right to be afraid. Only by embracing these two emotional pillars will you glimpse the nature of your soul, dosage which is the ground of your existence.” Suspend the notion that wanting is being greedy and don’t allow your censoring inner voice tell you it’s impossible. Think about your goals and dreams from a perspective of no limits and allow yourself to create an inspiring bucket list.  Ask yourself what you want that gives meaning to your life in each of these aspects and jot down a few notes as to why you want it.

  1. Life Partner
  2. Family, ask Friends and Community
  3. Health and Leisure
  4. Vocation
  5. Financials and Home
  6. Spirituality and Sense of Self

I’m sure you have a very good list to work with.  In the coming weeks we’ll work on identifying the priorities for your list of goals and begin to set achievable and sustainable goals to achieve the success you want.

 

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
The exercises you’ve done until now have likely highlighted a few areas of your life that need attention. These areas can form part of the goals you add to your bucket list. This week I invite you to think about what you really want in different aspects of your life. Forget what you need. As Author Thomas Moore says: “Admit to what you desire and what you fear… It’s all right to have grand and eccentric longings. It’s all right to be afraid. Only by embracing these two emotional pillars will you glimpse the nature of your soul, salve which is the ground of your existence.” Suspend the notion that wanting is being greedy and don’t allow your censoring inner voice tell you it’s impossible. Think about your goals and dreams from a perspective of no limits and allow yourself to create an inspiring bucket list.  Ask yourself what you want that gives meaning to your life in each of these aspects and jot down a few notes as to why you want it.

  1. Life Partner
  2. Family, order Friends and Community
  3. Health and Leisure
  4. Vocation
  5. Financials and Home
  6. Spirituality and Sense of Self

I’m sure you have a very good list to work with.  In the coming weeks we’ll work on identifying the priorities for your list of goals and begin to set achievable and sustainable goals to achieve the success you want.
The exercises you’ve done until now have likely highlighted a few areas of your life that need attention. These areas can form part of the goals you add to your bucket list. This week I invite you to think about what you really want in different aspects of your life. Forget what you need. As Author Thomas Moore says: “Admit to what you desire and what you fear… It’s all right to have grand and eccentric longings. It’s all right to be afraid. Only by embracing these two emotional pillars will you glimpse the nature of your soul, cialis which is the ground of your existence.” Suspend the notion that wanting is being greedy and don’t allow your censoring inner voice tell you it’s impossible. Think about your goals and dreams from a perspective of no limits and allow yourself to create an inspiring bucket list.  Ask yourself what you want that gives meaning to your life in each of these aspects and jot down a few notes as to why you want it.

  1. Life Partner
  2. Family, dosage Friends and Community
  3. Health and Leisure
  4. Vocation
  5. Financials and Home
  6. Spirituality and Sense of Self

I’m sure you have a very good list to work with.  In the coming weeks we’ll work on identifying the priorities for your list of goals and begin to set achievable and sustainable goals to achieve the success you want.
The exercises you’ve done until now have likely highlighted a few areas of your life that need attention. These areas can form part of the goals you add to your bucket list. This week I invite you to think about what you really want in different aspects of your life. Forget what you need. As Author Thomas Moore says: “Admit to what you desire and what you fear… It’s all right to have grand and eccentric longings. It’s all right to be afraid. Only by embracing these two emotional pillars will you glimpse the nature of your soul, search which is the ground of your existence.” Suspend the notion that wanting is being greedy and don’t allow your censoring inner voice tell you it’s impossible. Think about your goals and dreams from a perspective of no limits and allow yourself to create an inspiring bucket list.  Ask yourself what you want that gives meaning to your life in each of these aspects and jot down a few notes as to why you want it.

  1. Life Partner
  2. Family, nurse Friends and Community
  3. Health and Leisure
  4. Vocation
  5. Financials and Home
  6. Spirituality and Sense of Self

I’m sure you have a very good list to work with.  In the coming weeks we’ll work on identifying the priorities for your list of goals and begin to set achievable and sustainable goals to achieve the success you want.

 

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
The exercises you’ve done until now have likely highlighted a few areas of your life that need attention. These areas can form part of the goals you add to your bucket list. This week I invite you to think about what you really want in different aspects of your life. Forget what you need. As Author Thomas Moore says: “Admit to what you desire and what you fear… It’s all right to have grand and eccentric longings. It’s all right to be afraid. Only by embracing these two emotional pillars will you glimpse the nature of your soul, clinic which is the ground of your existence.” Suspend the notion that wanting is being greedy and don’t allow your censoring inner voice tell you it’s impossible. Think about your goals and dreams from a perspective of no limits and allow yourself to create an inspiring bucket list.  Ask yourself what you want that gives meaning to your life in each of these aspects and jot down a few notes as to why you want it.

  1. Life Partner
  2. Family, illness Friends and Community
  3. Health and Leisure
  4. Vocation
  5. Financials and Home
  6. Spirituality and Sense of Self

I’m sure you have a very good list to work with.  In the coming weeks we’ll work on identifying the priorities for your list of goals and begin to set achievable and sustainable goals to achieve the success you want.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
Although it may not always seem that way, prescription employees are really interested in seeing how they are performing.  They want to know how the company overall is performing, viagra buy but they are more interested in their own key performance indicators so they know how their team is contributing to the overall company results. As their leader, view work with them to create performance indicators that are meaningful to show how well the team is doing and where there are opportunities for improvement. Employees enjoy a challenge and the more they are involved in and understand their impact on the bottom line, the better they will perform and engage.
The concept of time is somewhat of a double-edged sword. On one hand, ailment time is simply a unit of measure. There are twenty-four hours in a day, online no more, story no less. And when we look at time in terms of meaningful moments it’s easy to focus on what’s most important and ensure that we live without regret. We all realize we only have a finite amount of time to achieve all that we dream about, yet we rarely take a moment to reflect on how to make the most use of this precious time. This week, take a few moments of reflection and ask yourself what you really want to accomplish that’s near and dear to your heart. Then commit to finding 1-2 hours each day to work on your dreams.

1. Based on my age today, what can I accomplish if I spend 1-2 hours each day to work on what really matters?

2. How can find 1-2 hours each day to work on dreams yet unfulfilled?

Once you start, you’ll find it’s amazingly easy to find the few hours every day.  Make a “Stop Doing…” list to make more time to focus on the right priorities. Then create a “Start Doing…” list that will inspire you to take action.  With a focused list you can look forward to doing the work you most need to do.  You may even decide that you want to spend more time each day working on what really matters.  That’s when you’ll know that you are focused on the right things.

 

Dianne is a business and life coach who helps client thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.

Engagement Tip # 15 – Measure Contribution

January brings with it the promise of a new year, a clean slate and a fresh start; which makes it a perfect time to take stock of what lies ahead and what’s possible. A wise professor once asked: “How can we know where we’re going if we don’t understand where we’ve been?” Taking stock allows us to do just that – to consider where we’ve been and what we’ve accomplished so that we create goals that are inspiring and aligned with where we want to go.

Life is lived at warp speed today and it’s easy to spend all your energies in reaction mode, doing what needs to be done and forgetting about your most important goals.  But at what cost?  When you’re too busy living you lose yourself in the process.  It's time to step back, reflect and plan more intentionally for what’s next.  By taking stock you can:

  1. Look at what’s working well in your life and build on it.
  2. Identify what needs attention in different aspects of your life.
  3. Understand what values and principles guide your life and work.
  4. Understand the challenges that keep getting the way.
  5. Learn to draw on your inner strengths and wisdom.

This month give yourself the gift of time and take stock of your life to see what emerges. You’ll amaze yourself with all that you’ve accomplished and what’s working well.  You’ll gain clarity on what you need to pay more attention to.  The exercises I'm going to suggest will give you a great start on creating goals that are important to you now.

 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
It seems like the right thing to do to begin your hero’s journey with a brand new journal and a package of colourful pens and pencils. Think of your journal as a blank canvas to create your future self. The action of putting pen to paper is powerful and brings clarity to the jumbled thoughts that occupy the mind, remedy especially in this incessant, on-demand world we live in. It lets your creativity flow uncensored and acts as a form of feedback analysis from you to you, like a mirror reflecting back. In this journal, you can pretend, without risks, try things on and dream big about what you picture yourself doing. You can dare yourself to admit, “Yes I can do this.” The act of making your ideas visible is the beginning of a promise to yourself to reach for your full potential. Select a journal that will inspire your best work. Make it elaborate or keep it simple. It’s yours to create, your own work of art.
The journey towards living a life on purpose begins by uncovering the many layers of your own life. One of these layers is your vocation - the work you do.  Other layers include your relationships, symptoms your well-being and your spiritual self. And since life is lived multi-dimensionally, prostate there is an interdependency that connects all of these rich layers together.  These layers call on you to express all that you can become. This week, buy take a few moments to answer the following questions.

  1. How well does my work contribute to my sense of well-being and sustain what’s important in other areas of my life? How does it contribute to my personal growth?
  2. The relationships in your life include your life partner, immediate and extended family, friends, business associates and co-workers.  What’s working really well in your relationships today?  What areas need attention?
  3. What are you doing to maintain your well-being, physically and psychologically? What needs attention? What leisure activities bring you the greatest joy and how do they contribute to your sense of well-being?
  4. How would you define your spirituality? How does it manifest in your life and in the life of those you love? How does it support you in your everyday life?

Understanding what’s working well in different aspects of your life will give you a good sense of what you need to keep doing and begin to highlight what needs attention.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com

 
The journey towards living a life on purpose begins by uncovering the many layers of your own life. One of these layers is your vocation - the work you do.  Other layers include your relationships, site your well-being and your spiritual self. And since life is lived multi-dimensionally, there is an interdependency that connects all of these rich layers together.  These layers call on you to express all that you can become. This week, take a few moments to answer the following questions.

  1. How well does my work contribute to my sense of well-being and sustain what’s important in other areas of my life? How does it contribute to my personal growth?
  2. The relationships in your life include your life partner, immediate and extended family, friends, business associates and co-workers.  What’s working really well in your relationships today?  What areas need attention?
  3. What are you doing to maintain your well-being, physically and psychologically? What needs attention? What leisure activities bring you the greatest joy and how do they contribute to your sense of well-being?
  4. How would you define your spirituality? How does it manifest in your life and in the life of those you love? How does it support you in your everyday life?

Understanding what’s working well in different aspects of your life will give you a good sense of what you need to keep doing and begin to highlight what needs attention.
The journey towards living a life on purpose begins by uncovering the many layers of your own life. One of these layers is your vocation - the work you do.  Other layers include your relationships, buy your well-being and your spiritual self. And since life is lived multi-dimensionally, story there is an interdependency that connects all of these rich layers together.  These layers call on you to express all that you can become. This week, take a few moments to answer the following questions.

  1. How well does my work contribute to my sense of well-being and sustain what’s important in other areas of my life? How does it contribute to my personal growth?
  2. The relationships in your life include your life partner, immediate and extended family, friends, business associates and co-workers.  What’s working really well in your relationships today?  What areas need attention?
  3. What are you doing to maintain your well-being, physically and psychologically? What needs attention? What leisure activities bring you the greatest joy and how do they contribute to your sense of well-being?
  4. How would you define your spirituality? How does it manifest in your life and in the life of those you love? How does it support you in your everyday life?

Understanding what’s working well in different aspects of your life will give you a good sense of what you need to keep doing and begin to highlight what needs attention.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com

 
Balance might best be defined as an intangible feeling or intuition that all is right in our own piece of the world or as a barometer of happiness and contentment. It is elusive perhaps because perfect balance simply does not exist. What feels like a balanced life to one person may feel very chaotic for someone else. Feeling balanced means you feel renewed, viagra centered and committed to what’s important in your life. You’re in a better position to face challenges head on and as a result you feel less stressed. Your self-esteem and confidence are high and you feel a sense of overall well-being. In essence, it’s you at peak performance.

  1. On a scale of 1-10 with ten being very high, what is your level of balance today?
  2. What are you doing when you feel most in balance?
  3. What makes you feel out of balance?

If you find that you’re feeling out of balance, try to identify the specific areas, pick one to work on and create 3-6 small steps that you can take to regain balance in that areas.  Then do the same for other areas.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
Balance might best be defined as an intangible feeling or intuition that all is right in our own piece of the world or as a barometer of happiness and contentment. It is elusive perhaps because perfect balance simply does not exist. What feels like a balanced life to one person may feel very chaotic for someone else. Feeling balanced means you feel renewed, store centered and committed to what’s important in your life. You’re in a better position to face challenges head on and as a result you feel less stressed. Your self-esteem and confidence are high and you feel a sense of overall well-being. In essence, it’s you at peak performance.

  1. On a scale of 1-10 with ten being very high, what is your level of balance today?
  2. What are you doing when you feel most in balance?
  3. What makes you feel out of balance?

If you find that you’re feeling out of balance, try to identify the specific areas, pick one to work on and create 3-6 small steps that you can take to regain balance in that areas.  Then do the same for other areas.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
If someone asked you to describe yourself, sickness what would you say?  It isn’t easy to tell someone else who you are in a short and precise answer. You are much more than anyone can ever see. They see your mannerisms and expressions, search hear your words and observe your actions. But your private thoughts, pharm feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts can’t be seen. This week, begin to create a picture that expresses all that you are. Let your imagine soar by imagining you’re interviewing a famous person - you.  You might ask:

  • What hobbies do you have? What do you enjoy doing when you’re at home? What do you do for fun?
  • Who are the important people who share your life?
  • What are you most proud of?
  • What do you do really well in your work?
  • What are your greatest talents?  Skills? Abilities?
  • What gives you the greatest joy and you love so much that you get lost in it and lose all track of time?
  • What key principles do you hold dear and how do they manifest in your everyday actions?
  • What values are important to you, in your life and at work?  How do they inspire what you say and do?

What else would you ask?  You might surprise yourself whit all that you learn about yourself by doing this exercise. Better still, ask a friend to help you with this exercise. It will be more fun.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
If someone asked you to describe yourself, pill what would you say?  It isn’t easy to tell someone else who you are in a short and precise answer. You are much more than anyone can ever see. They see your mannerisms and expressions, hear your words and observe your actions. But your private thoughts, feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts can’t be seen. This week, begin to create a picture that expresses all that you are. Let your imagine soar by imagining you’re interviewing a famous person - you.  You might ask:

  • What hobbies do you have? What do you enjoy doing when you’re at home? What do you do for fun?
  • Who are the important people who share your life?
  • What are you most proud of?
  • What do you do really well in your work?
  • What are your greatest talents?  Skills? Abilities?
  • What gives you the greatest joy and you love so much that you get lost in it and lose all track of time?
  • What key principles do you hold dear and how do they manifest in your everyday actions?
  • What values are important to you, in your life and at work?  How do they inspire what you say and do?

What else would you ask?  You might surprise yourself whit all that you learn about yourself by doing this exercise. Better still, ask a friend to help you with this exercise. It will be more fun.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com
Although it may not always seem that way, search employees are really interested in seeing how they are performing.  They want to know how the company overall is performing, help but they are more interested in their own key performance indicators so they know how their team is contributing to the overall company results. As their leader, doctor work with them to create performance indicators that are meaningful to show how well the team is doing and where there are opportunities for improvement. Employees enjoy a challenge and the more they are involved in and understand their impact on the bottom line, the better they will perform and engage.

Continue Reading

Week 9 – Creating An Inspiring Bucket List

The exercises you’ve done until now have likely highlighted a few areas of your life that need attention. These areas can form part of the goals you add to your bucket list. This week I invite you to think about what you really want in different aspects of your life. Forget what you need. As Author Thomas Moore says: “Admit to what you desire and what you fear… It’s all right to have grand and eccentric longings. It’s all right to be afraid. Only by embracing these two emotional pillars will you glimpse the nature of your soul, dosage which is the ground of your existence.” Suspend the notion that wanting is being greedy and don’t allow your censoring inner voice tell you it’s impossible. Think about your goals and dreams from a perspective of no limits and allow yourself to create an inspiring bucket list.  Ask yourself what you want that gives meaning to your life in each of these aspects and jot down a few notes as to why you want it.

  1. Life Partner
  2. Family, ask Friends and Community
  3. Health and Leisure
  4. Vocation
  5. Financials and Home
  6. Spirituality and Sense of Self

I’m sure you have a very good list to work with.  In the coming weeks we’ll work on identifying the priorities for your list of goals and begin to set achievable and sustainable goals to achieve the success you want.

 

Dianne is a business and life coach and author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information, visit www.inkiesta.com