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A Contemplative Leader is More Than a Competent Strategist

stonesThe alarm bells are ringing and no one seems to be listening. The statistics on overall health and wellness are staggering and getting worst. According to Stats Canada:

  • 53% of adults in Canada are considered overweight or obese
  • 1 in 5 children are overweight or obese
  • 44.8% of adults are inactive
  • 22.7% of people over the age of 15 feel quite a bit or extreme stress.

If we keep going in this direction, seek what will it mean as we age and for younger generations.  It’s not like we don’t know what to do.  We know that lack of physical activity combined with high stress and poor eating habits contributes to increased risks for cancers, link diabetes, heart disease and immune system complications. So what are we waiting for? We can no longer afford to take our health for granted. According to Psychologist, Kenneth Pargament, “Having a future to plan for and strive toward is essential to our health and well-being. We need to see our bodies as the sacred home for our physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual wellbeing.  A well-functioning body helps us to experience life positively, to contemplate and to achieve our dreams. We need to take charge and create a new vision for our own health and wellbeing.

When you’re healthy, what does it feel like? Is it being physically fit and having energy for the activities you most enjoy doing with your loved ones; or is it maintaining normal ranges in blood sugars, cholesterol and blood pressure? Is it feeling vibrant, energetic, confident and resilient? Does healthy mean feeling relaxed and having an outlet to deal with the stresses of life, remaining positive and having the fortitude to meet challenges head on?  Whatever your reasons for getting and staying health, you need to keep a constant vigilance. Short term diets or poorly planned fitness programs, or short decompression vacations will not do it. A long term vision and strategy that builds and maintains health throughout your life is needed, and it takes planning and daily small steps to achieve and sustain your goals or to get back on track when you stumble. As you’re crafting your own vision of what health looks like, consider these four anchors in your plans.

  1.  Nutrition –research what portions are appropriate for your age and energy needs; number of carbohydrates, protein, fruits and vegetables, grains and dairy needed every day.  Get into the habit of planning your meals on a weekly basis to save time and money.  By planning you’ll eat better as well. Make time to savour and enjoy your meals instead of eating on the run.  A good place to start is the Canada Health Food Guide at www.hc-sc.gc.ca
  2.  Physical fitness – Find one or two physical activities that are enjoyable such as going to the gym, running, walking, yoga, swimming, playing a team sport.  Schedule this activity in your day planner, like you schedule other appointments and meetings. Find ways to incorporate physical activity into your work day such as stretching, running errands during lunch, walking.  Try a new activity that is both fun and fitness oriented like a dance class or participating in a charity walk with a friends and family. Start with three, 30-minute activities each week to get started and increase your time as your fitness improves. You can find a ton of ideas at www.participaction.ca.
  3.  Mental fitness – To reduce stress try to identify the causes and find ways to reduce the stressors. Accept there will be challenges and try to keep your thoughts positive to help you ride out these storms more easily. Journaling can help.  Make time to laugh and find quiet activities such as reading a favourite book, reflecting on what’s working well and make plans. Find lots of tools at The Canadian Mental Health Association at www.cmha.ca.
  4. Restorative rest and relaxation – In addition to your regular vacation, plan some time each week to rejuvenate, even if it’s only 30-60 minutes.  Get a message, essential oils or other alternative therapies that are designed to help you slow down.  Treat yourself to a pedicure, manicure, facial or spa. Meditate, listen to your favourite music or take a stroll along the beach or in a natural setting. Have an electronics and TV free day each week.   Check out www.greatist.com for a great variety of ideas and tips.

By creating a vision and taking small steps each and every day to achieve it, you’ll look and feel great and you will grow old with grace and independence. You’ll reduce your risk for many diseases and feel more balanced and happy. Your loved ones will notice too and they may be inspired to do the same.
stonesThe alarm bells are ringing and no one seems to be listening. The statistics on overall health and wellness are staggering and getting worst. According to Stats Canada:

  • 53% of adults in Canada are considered overweight or obese
  • 1 in 5 children are overweight or obese
  • 44.8% of adults are inactive
  • 22.7% of people over the age of 15 feel quite a bit or extreme stress.

If we keep going in this direction, pharm what will it mean as we age and for younger generations.  It’s not like we don’t know what to do.  We know that lack of physical activity combined with high stress and poor eating habits contributes to increased risks for cancers, salve diabetes, viagra heart disease and immune system complications. So what are we waiting for? We can no longer afford to take our health for granted. According to Psychologist, Kenneth Pargament, “Having a future to plan for and strive toward is essential to our health and well-being. We need to see our bodies as the sacred home for our physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual wellbeing.  A well-functioning body helps us to experience life positively, to contemplate and to achieve our dreams. We need to take charge and create a new vision for our own health and wellbeing.

When you’re healthy, what does it feel like? Is it being physically fit and having energy for the activities you most enjoy doing with your loved ones; or is it maintaining normal ranges in blood sugars, cholesterol and blood pressure? Is it feeling vibrant, energetic, confident and resilient? Does healthy mean feeling relaxed and having an outlet to deal with the stresses of life, remaining positive and having the fortitude to meet challenges head on?  Whatever your reasons for getting and staying health, you need to keep a constant vigilance. Short term diets or poorly planned fitness programs, or short decompression vacations will not do it. A long term vision and strategy that builds and maintains health throughout your life is needed, and it takes planning and daily small steps to achieve and sustain your goals or to get back on track when you stumble. As you’re crafting your own vision of what health looks like, consider these four anchors in your plans.

  1.  Nutrition –research what portions are appropriate for your age and energy needs; number of carbohydrates, protein, fruits and vegetables, grains and dairy needed every day.  Get into the habit of planning your meals on a weekly basis to save time and money.  By planning you’ll eat better as well. Make time to savour and enjoy your meals instead of eating on the run.  A good place to start is the Canada Health Food Guide at www.hc-sc.gc.ca
  2.  Physical fitness – Find one or two physical activities that are enjoyable such as going to the gym, running, walking, yoga, swimming, playing a team sport.  Schedule this activity in your day planner, like you schedule other appointments and meetings. Find ways to incorporate physical activity into your work day such as stretching, running errands during lunch, walking.  Try a new activity that is both fun and fitness oriented like a dance class or participating in a charity walk with a friends and family. Start with three, 30-minute activities each week to get started and increase your time as your fitness improves. You can find a ton of ideas at www.participaction.ca.
  3.  Mental fitness – To reduce stress try to identify the causes and find ways to reduce the stressors. Accept there will be challenges and try to keep your thoughts positive to help you ride out these storms more easily. Journaling can help.  Make time to laugh and find quiet activities such as reading a favourite book, reflecting on what’s working well and make plans. Find lots of tools at The Canadian Mental Health Association at www.cmha.ca.
  4. Restorative rest and relaxation – In addition to your regular vacation, plan some time each week to rejuvenate, even if it’s only 30-60 minutes.  Get a message, essential oils or other alternative therapies that are designed to help you slow down.  Treat yourself to a pedicure, manicure, facial or spa. Meditate, listen to your favourite music or take a stroll along the beach or in a natural setting. Have an electronics and TV free day each week.   Check out www.greatist.com for a great variety of ideas and tips.

By creating a vision and taking small steps each and every day to achieve it, you’ll look and feel great and you will grow old with grace and independence. You’ll reduce your risk for many diseases and feel more balanced and happy. Your loved ones will notice too and they may be inspired to do the same.
stonesThe alarm bells are ringing and no one seems to be listening. The statistics on overall health and wellness are staggering and getting worst. According to Stats Canada:

  • 53% of adults in Canada are considered overweight or obese
  • 1 in 5 children are overweight or obese
  • 44.8% of adults are inactive
  • 22.7% of people over the age of 15 feel quite a bit or extreme stress.

If we keep going in this direction, discount what will it mean as we age and for younger generations.  It’s not like we don’t know what to do.  We know that lack of physical activity combined with high stress and poor eating habits contributes to increased risks for cancers, pilule diabetes, heart disease and immune system complications. So what are we waiting for? We can no longer afford to take our health for granted. According to Psychologist, Kenneth Pargament, “Having a future to plan for and strive toward is essential to our health and well-being. We need to see our bodies as the sacred home for our physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual wellbeing.  A well-functioning body helps us to experience life positively, to contemplate and to achieve our dreams. We need to take charge and create a new vision for our own health and wellbeing.

When you’re healthy, what does it feel like? Is it being physically fit and having energy for the activities you most enjoy doing with your loved ones; or is it maintaining normal ranges in blood sugars, cholesterol and blood pressure? Is it feeling vibrant, energetic, confident and resilient? Does healthy mean feeling relaxed and having an outlet to deal with the stresses of life, remaining positive and having the fortitude to meet challenges head on?  Whatever your reasons for getting and staying health, you need to keep a constant vigilance. Short term diets or poorly planned fitness programs, or short decompression vacations will not do it. A long term vision and strategy that builds and maintains health throughout your life is needed, and it takes planning and daily small steps to achieve and sustain your goals or to get back on track when you stumble. As you’re crafting your own vision of what health looks like, consider these four anchors in your plans.

  1.  Nutrition –research what portions are appropriate for your age and energy needs; number of carbohydrates, protein, fruits and vegetables, grains and dairy needed every day.  Get into the habit of planning your meals on a weekly basis to save time and money.  By planning you’ll eat better as well. Make time to savour and enjoy your meals instead of eating on the run.  A good place to start is the Canada Health Food Guide at www.hc-sc.gc.ca
  2.  Physical fitness – Find one or two physical activities that are enjoyable such as going to the gym, running, walking, yoga, swimming, playing a team sport.  Schedule this activity in your day planner, like you schedule other appointments and meetings. Find ways to incorporate physical activity into your work day such as stretching, running errands during lunch, walking.  Try a new activity that is both fun and fitness oriented like a dance class or participating in a charity walk with a friends and family. Start with three, 30-minute activities each week to get started and increase your time as your fitness improves. You can find a ton of ideas at www.participaction.ca.
  3.  Mental fitness – To reduce stress try to identify the causes and find ways to reduce the stressors. Accept there will be challenges and try to keep your thoughts positive to help you ride out these storms more easily. Journaling can help.  Make time to laugh and find quiet activities such as reading a favourite book, reflecting on what’s working well and make plans. Find lots of tools at The Canadian Mental Health Association at www.cmha.ca.
  4. Restorative rest and relaxation – In addition to your regular vacation, plan some time each week to rejuvenate, even if it’s only 30-60 minutes.  Get a message, essential oils or other alternative therapies that are designed to help you slow down.  Treat yourself to a pedicure, manicure, facial or spa. Meditate, listen to your favourite music or take a stroll along the beach or in a natural setting. Have an electronics and TV free day each week.   Check out www.greatist.com for a great variety of ideas and tips.

By creating a vision and taking small steps each and every day to achieve it, you’ll look and feel great and you will grow old with grace and independence. You’ll reduce your risk for many diseases and feel more balanced and happy. Your loved ones will notice too and they may be inspired to do the same.
Contemplate LeaderTo flourish in today’s demanding and complex business environments, pill leaders need more than just good strategic thinking and planning skills. They can no longer rely on old tried and true models of traditional leadership and expect to achieve new levels of success. For starters they need to be customer centric, viagra 60mg strategic visionaries and compelling communicators. As you read the definitions of a contemplative leader, nurse think of someone who exemplifies these competencies. Ask yourself what specific behaviours this leader demonstrates and how is he impacting your employees differently than other leaders who don’t yet have these competencies.

Contemplative leaders are Customer Centric. These leaders are passionate about understanding the key drivers of success for their customers. They find ways to say yes to customers with enabling policies, programs and processes. They remove barriers and promote high standards of customer service at all levels of the organization. Customer centric leaders make it easy for customers to do business with them and are relentless in cultivating an employee mindset which is focused on finding new ways to anticipate needs and exceed customer expectations. They build loyalty by listening and responding to their customers’ concerns and feedback and they make continual improvements to their levels of customer service.

Contemplative leaders are Innovators. Not content with the status quo, these leaders leverage innovation and technology to increase and maintain the competitive advantage of their organizations. Innovators advocate for and are catalysts for new thinking. They foster open environments, seek employee input and ideas; and encourage them to challenge conventional thinking. They remain open to fresh perspectives that lead to exceptional customer service and enhanced business results.

Contemplative leaders are Visionaries. They are highly aware of opportunities in the global market place and the organization’s strengths and weaknesses. They use this information along with analytics to identify trends and shape the vision and mission of their organization. They apply global thinking to shape a vision of what’s possible. These leaders establish and model values that are congruent with the organization’s mission and vision.

Contemplative leaders are Strategists. Strategically oriented leaders create audacious goals to maximize the potentiality of the organization and, at the same time, focus on the right activities. They ensure that corporate goals are cascaded throughout the organization and that they are aligned vertically and horizontally across the organization. These leaders create scorecards and key performance indicators to measure trends and results in all key business activities. Effective strategists build on and leverage collaborative relationships across business units and corporate services to align efforts and create agility in the organization. They allocate resources to maximize profits and productivity while eliminating waste and minimizing costs.

Contemplative leaders are Analysts. They make use of the analytics and tools available to dissect business information and understand what’s happening in the external environment and industries that can potentially impact their strategies. These leaders judiciously evaluate the outcomes of the previous business cycles to learn about the organization’s successes and failures. They make decisions that are well-informed, supported by the analytics and aligned with company values and principles.

Effective contemplative leaders are Compelling Communicators. They create multi-directional channels and relentlessly communicate their vision, values, strategic goals, objectives and organizational changes to all stakeholders. They use a variety of media and platforms to provide information, seek feedback and measure the effectiveness of all communications. Their open door model ensures a constant flow of information and breaks down barriers. Communication channels are top-down, bottom-up, lateral, cross-functional and peer to peer.

Written by

Dianne Gaudet is a certified Coach who is passionate about helping her clients manage the dynamics of continual life transitions as they reach new heights of personal and professional success. Helping Boomers create rich and inspired lifestyle plans for the retirement life they want is one of her greatest joys. Dianne is the author of a new book, If There Are No Limits... A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. She is also a motivational speaker, teacher and world traveller.