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Engagement Tip # 12 – Hold Effective Meetings

Z Life is a Canvas

That’s why they invented paint brushes and crayons.  Go ahead and throw all the paint you can at your own life canvas and make it a true masterpiece!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
You’ve just received an invitation to an interview for your dream job. You’re excited and nervous. You make notes, pills review your resume, order try to anticipate questions from the job ad and prepare your answers. You jot down a few notes about your education, shop work experience, skills and maybe a few details about your hobbies and interests. You feeling confident as you go into the interview, until the dreaded question is asked. “Tell me about yourself.” You hum and sigh and show obvious discomfort in finding the right words to answer such a broad and open-ended question. You think to yourself, I’m blowing it, right out of the gate. The rest of the interview is a blur.

In many ways the question is not a fair one. It is way too broad, difficult to answer and almost impossible to rate. Many interviewers believe that this question will help the candidate relax when in fact it usually has the opposite effect. Here’s why. We are so much more than interviewers can ever see. They can get a glimpse of our personality through mannerisms, behaviours, words, expressions, and actions. But they can’t see our private thoughts, feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts. To try to express all of this in one simple answer is daunting at best.

There is hope. The best way to answer this question is to tell the interviews a short story about one of the most important goals you’ve achieved, either at work or in your life. A great tool to use in preparing for such a wide-opened question is the iceberg metaphor.

Level one – above the surface. Give an overview of your goal. Explain what you were trying to do, what actions you took and what results you achieved. This will give the interviewer a good sense of your abilities, commitment to carry it through and some indication about your potential.

Level two – just below the surface. Add details about any challenges you faced, the actions you took to solve the issues, how you applied creativity and made choices. This will show the interviewer how you took control of the situation to create the outcome your wanted.

Level three – deep below the surface. Interviewers hope that by asking this broad question they will get at the heart of the candidate. Use the opportunity to express more about yourself as you answer this question. Describe what your thought process was, how you felt, what motivated you to achieve this goal and what you learned about yourself. This will give them clues about what energizes and motivates you, and how you do your best work.

Taking time to prepare for this question is probably the best investment you can make. It is highly likely you will be asked this question many times in your career. Practice telling your story, until you have it down to 60-90 seconds. It will give you more control and confidence and you’ll nail the interview.

 
You just received an invitation to an interview for your dream job. You’re excited and nervous. You make notes, review your resume, ed try to anticipate questions from the job ad and prepare your answers. You jot down a few notes about your education, order work experience, skills and maybe a few details about your hobbies and interests. You feeling confident as you go into the interview, until the dreaded question is asked. “Tell me about yourself.” You hum and sigh and show obvious discomfort in finding the right words to answer such a broad and open-ended question. You think to yourself, I’m blowing it, right out of the gate. The rest of the interview is a blur.

In many ways the question is not a fair one. It is way too broad, difficult to answer and almost impossible to rate. Many interviewers believe that this question will help the candidate relax when in fact it usually has the opposite effect. Here’s why. We are so much more than interviewers can ever see. They can get a glimpse of our personality through mannerisms, behaviours, words, expressions, and actions. But they can’t see our private thoughts, feelings, hopes, dreams, fears and doubts. To try to express all of this in one simple answer is daunting at best.

There is hope. The best way to answer this question is to tell the interviews a short story about one of the most important goals you’ve achieved, either at work or in your life. A great tool to use in preparing for such a wide-opened question is the iceberg metaphor.

Level one – above the surface. Give an overview of your goal. Explain what you were trying to do, what actions you took and what results you achieved. This will give the interviewer a good sense of your abilities, commitment to carry it through and some indication about your potential.

Level two – just below the surface. Add details about any challenges you faced, the actions you took to solve the issues, how you applied creativity and made choices. This will show the interviewer how you took control of the situation to create the outcome your wanted.

Level three – deep below the surface. Interviewers hope that by asking this broad question they will get at the heart of the candidate. Use the opportunity to express more about yourself as you answer this question. Describe what your thought process was, how you felt, what motivated you to achieve this goal and what you learned about yourself. This will give them clues about what energizes and motivates you, and how you do your best work.

Taking time to prepare for this question is probably the best investment you can make. It is highly likely you will be asked this question many times in your career. Practice telling your story, until you have it down to 60-90 seconds. It will give you more control and confidence and you’ll nail the interview.

 
Silence is not always golden. Holding back vital business information from employees, cialis especially when things are heading in the wrong direction, is usually the worst kept secret, and may keep you from finding the solutions that are critical to turn things around. Employees know when things aren’t going well.  They can see it and sense it from your behaviours or your language.  Be a courageous leader and let them know what’s going on, then, invite them to help you right the ship.  Send your employees a powerful message that “we’re all in this together”, one of the many great quotes from Steve Smith of the Red Green Show. You may not be able to fix your business’ financial issues with duct tape but you will go a long way in sending a powerful message to your employees that you need their help and value their contributions. At the end of the day, all employees want from their leaders is the truth; good, bad or ugly, so that they can do what needs to be done to keep the ship going in the right direction.
Silence is not always golden. Holding back vital business information from employees, pilule especially when things are heading in the wrong direction, adiposity is usually the worst kept secret, medications and may keep you from finding the solutions that are critical to turn things around. Employees know when things aren’t going well.  They can see it and sense it from your behaviours or your language.  Be a courageous leader and let them know what’s going on, then, invite them to help you right the ship.  Send your employees a powerful message that “we’re all in this together”, one of the many great quotes from Steve Smith of the Red Green Show. You may not be able to fix your business’ financial issues with duct tape but you will go a long way in sending a powerful message to your employees that you need their help and value their contributions. At the end of the day, all employees want from their leaders is the truth; good, bad or ugly, so that they can do what needs to be done to keep the ship going in the right direction.
Silence is not always golden. Holding back vital business information from employees, especially when things are heading in the wrong direction, is usually the worst kept secret, adiposity and may keep you from finding the solutions that are critical to turn things around. Employees know when things aren’t going well.  They can see it and sense it from your behaviours or your language.  Be a courageous leader and let them know what’s going on, then, invite them to help you right the ship.  Send your employees a powerful message that “we’re all in this together”, one of the many great quotes from Steve Smith of the Red Green Show. You may not be able to fix your business’ financial issues with duct tape but you will go a long way in sending a powerful message to your employees that you need their help and value their contributions. At the end of the day, all employees want from their leaders is the truth; good, bad or ugly, so that they can do what needs to be done to keep the ship going in the right direction.
Continuous learning is vital to business success, price but often confused as being synonymous with extravagant learning events and high dollar spend. The best learning happens when it relates to the job your employees are doing and connected to your industry. There are many easy ways to keep learning vibrant. One is to read and discuss articles that are related to your work environment. Another is to encourage your employees to identify five to ten things they would love to learn more about and make that part of their learning objectives. It could be looking for white papers or new articles about your industry, pills joining a webinar about a topic of interest, recipe taking an on-line course, or learning about another area of your business. With today’s access to information and free on-line learning resources, it is easier than ever to find quick ways to build on knowledge without having to spend significant resources. All you need to do is model the way by making continuous learning a part of your own development, and by creating a process for your employees to share what they learn with you and their colleagues. It will make learning meaningful and you won’t have to break the bank.

 

Dianne is a certified coach who is passionate about helping individuals and business leaders thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions.  She is the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. For more information visit her website at www.inkiesta.com.

Fear is the single, order biggest obstacle preventing us from achieving our most cherished dreams and goals. What are we afraid of, exactly? Are we afraid we’ll succeed beyond our wildest dreams or that we’ll feel shameful in our greatest defeats? Fear is a great paradox. We fear the things we want the most, and at the same time, fear will always be a constant companion when we stretch ourselves and reach for our goals. It’s natural to feel fear. But when it gets in the way of what we most need to do, it becomes an obstacle. Fear comes in many disguises:

  • We make excuses to avoid doing or saying what we know we need to do or say.
  • We avoid doing what is necessary by distracting ourselves with mindless and meaningless activities, like surfing the net or watching TV.
  • We procrastinate and in the process harbour all the guilt that comes with knowing that we are holding back.
  • We deny, to ourselves and to others, the importance of what it is we must do.
  • We develop habits that serve to protect us from our fears, but do little for our peace of mind.

The danger of staying stuck in fear is that we will end up with an ocean of regrets and a litany of coulda, woulda, shouldas.  And we don’t want that. This week, take a few moments to name the fears you have about reaching your most important dreams and goals. Next week we’ll look at a process to overcome and move through those fears.
Fear is the single, sales biggest obstacle preventing us from achieving our most cherished dreams and goals. What are we afraid of, viagra buy exactly? Are we afraid we’ll succeed beyond our wildest dreams or that we’ll feel shameful in our greatest defeats? Fear is a great paradox. We fear the things we want the most, ed and at the same time, fear will always be a constant companion when we stretch ourselves and reach for our goals. It’s natural to feel fear. But when it gets in the way of what we most need to do, it becomes an obstacle. Fear comes in many disguises:

  • We make excuses to avoid doing or saying what we know we need to do or say.
  • We avoid doing what is necessary by distracting ourselves with mindless and meaningless activities, like surfing the net or watching TV.
  • We procrastinate and in the process harbour all the guilt that comes with knowing that we are holding back.
  • We deny, to ourselves and to others, the importance of what it is we must do.
  • We develop habits that serve to protect us from our fears, but do little for our peace of mind.

The danger of staying stuck in fear is that we will end up with an ocean of regrets and a litany of coulda, woulda, shouldas.  And we don’t want that. This week, take a few moments to name the fears you have about reaching your most important dreams and goals. Next week we’ll look at a process to overcome and move through those fears.
Poorly organized meetings are one of the biggest time wasters and sources of irritant for employees. If meetings aren’t addressing important issues, healing solving problems, developing or improving processes, conveying critical information or developing employees, leaders have to question the value of those meetings. Holding effective meetings may seem elementary, but the most basic of functions are often anything but simple. To deliver productive meetings, have a clear agenda and invite only those participants who are necessary to address the agenda. Provide information to the attendees prior to the meeting so that they can come prepared to discuss and contribute to the agenda. Keep minutes of the decisions that are made and use quick and easy communication vehicles to communicate those decisions to the rest of your team.  Your employees and colleagues will appreciate the efficiency of these meetings, waste less time and increase their own productivity. And you will be showing them how much you value their time.

Written by

Dianne Gaudet is a certified Coach who is passionate about helping her clients manage the dynamics of continual life transitions as they reach new heights of personal and professional success. Helping Boomers create rich and inspired lifestyle plans for the retirement life they want is one of her greatest joys. Dianne is the author of a new book, If There Are No Limits... A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. She is also a motivational speaker, teacher and world traveller.