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Engagement Tip # 23 – Keep The Creative Juices Flowing

It’s so easy to fall into the trap of traditional leadership views where only the leader has all the answers.  And how exhausting that must be for the leader. In the “busy-ness” of multiple priorities, case it may seem easier to tell employees what to do for the sake of expediency, instead of tapping into the genial ideas your employees have. But given the opportunity, employees will find innovative solutions to create easier ways of doing business; solve problems or increase productivity. Your employees are an immense resource just waiting for opportunities to engage in new and innovating ways to add value. Everyone benefits when leaders tap into those brilliant ideas and allow employees to lighten the load for everyone.
Now that you have a great goal to pursue, order one that is motivating and meaningful to you, pharmacy there are a few things you can do to guarantee you’ll achieve the success you want.  Like a garden, medicine a goal needs to be tended to if it is to flourish. The steps below will help you achieve the success you want.

  1. Weekly:  At the beginning of each week, take a few moments to make a list of all steps you will take over 5-7 days that week to accomplish one or two of the actions you have in your goal. Try to aim for 2-3 steps each day and keep in mind all the other life and work priorities you have, so that your calendar doesn’t get so full, it acts as a de-motivator. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get off track.  If weekends are too busy, you may not have time to work towards your goal on Saturdays and Sundays.
  2. Daily:  Add your 2-3 small steps to your daily planner. The act of writing down the steps in your planner is motivating, and because the steps are small, you’ll feel confident you can achieve them.  It is said that “a goal written down is a goal have done.” If the steps are in your planner, you are much more likely to make time to get these done.
  3. Nightly:  At the end of each day, take 5 minutes to review how you did.  If you were able all the steps you had planned to get done, congratulate yourself. Don’t worry that you miss a step here and there, just move it to the next day.

Too often we give up on goals because we feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work that is needed.  Worst, we feel guilty or inadequate when we fail to achieve the unachievable tasks we set out to do.  We fill our days with too many activities and berate ourselves for not getting all done. By breaking the actions from your goals into manageable steps, the likelihood of succeeding is much higher. You can do the same thing for all your other priorities. Forget the guilt when you have an off day and focus instead on what you did accomplish. Keep your eye on the ultimate prize which is the accomplishment of a meaningful goal and high value priorities that will enrich your life.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.  For more information, visit the other pages on the website.
Now that you have a great goal to pursue, order one that is motivating and meaningful to you, there are a few things you can do to guarantee you’ll achieve the success you want.  Like a garden, a goal needs to be tended to if it is to flourish. The steps below will help you achieve the success you want.

  1. Weekly:  At the beginning of each week, take a few moments to make a list of all steps you will take over 5-7 days that week to accomplish one or two of the actions you have in your goal. Try to aim for 2-3 steps each day and keep in mind all the other life and work priorities you have, so that your calendar doesn’t get so full, it acts as a de-motivator. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get off track.  If weekends are too busy, you may not have time to work towards your goal on Saturdays and Sundays.
  2. Daily:  Add your 2-3 small steps to your daily planner. The act of writing down the steps in your planner is motivating, and because the steps are small, you’ll feel confident you can achieve them.  It is said that “a goal written down is a goal have done.” If the steps are in your planner, you are much more likely to make time to get these done.
  3. Nightly:  At the end of each day, take 5 minutes to review how you did.  If you were able all the steps you had planned to get done, congratulate yourself. Don’t worry that you miss a step here and there, just move it to the next day.

Too often we give up on goals because we feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of work that is needed.  Worst, we feel guilty or inadequate when we fail to achieve the unachievable tasks we set out to do.  We fill our days with too many activities and berate ourselves for not getting all done. By breaking the actions from your goals into manageable steps, the likelihood of succeeding is much higher. You can do the same thing for all your other priorities. Forget the guilt when you have an off day and focus instead on what you did accomplish. Keep your eye on the ultimate prize which is the accomplishment of a meaningful goal and high value priorities that will enrich your life.

 

Dianne is a business and personal coach who helps individuals thrive as they successfully manage the dynamics of continual transitions; and the author of a new book: If There Are No Limits… A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities.  For more information, visit the other pages on the website.
Most of the communication related to organizational changes continues to be delivered in a top-down mode. Leaders receive information from higher levels of the organization; pass it down to their employees and move on to the next task. With this style of communication it’s almost impossible for employees to engage with the new changes, viagra which often leads to unnecessary resistance. The main reason employees resist is that they have unanswered questions or they need time to process how the change fits with and impacts their work. Leaders can facilitate the process by creating feedback loops where employees can provide impressions, ask questions and clarify information to increase their understanding. Once they understand, vcialis 40mg employee will often provide input on how to adapt the change to their own work so they can adjust more quickly to the new reality. The feedback loop leads to continuous learning, early adoption and even process improvements. Everyone benefits.
Most of the communication related to organizational changes continues to be delivered in a top-down mode. Leaders receive information from higher levels of the organization; pass it down to their employees and move on to the next task. With this style of communication it’s almost impossible for employees to engage with the new changes, clinic which often leads to unnecessary resistance. The main reason employees resist is that they have unanswered questions or they need time to process how the change fits with and impacts their work. Leaders can facilitate the process by creating feedback loops where employees can provide impressions, check ask questions and clarify information to increase their understanding. Once they understand, employee will often provide input on how to adapt the change to their own work so they can adjust more quickly to the new reality. The feedback loop leads to continuous learning, early adoption and even process improvements. Everyone benefits.
The easy part is setting a goal.  Once it’s set, viagra sale we’re excited to get started and we go at it like there’s nothing else in the world.  Then reality hits, life gets in the way and the momentum stops.  Giving up is an option, but one that rarely feels good.  More often than not, the reasons we give up on a goal have more to do with time, the size of the goal and motivation for the goal.

  1. Time: Often we create great goals but forget to build in time each day to actually get them done.  We lead busy lives and it’s easy to lose track of our goals in the “busy-ness” of everyday priorities.
  2. Size: At the beginning of the year when we set New Year’s resolutions, we’re pretty motivated to do what needs to be done to achieve the resolution.  But we all know what happens a few weeks later.  Goals are the same way.  When they are too big or ambitious, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and to let them fizzle out.  To ensure success, break the goals down into steps that can be managed within the list of all other priorities that needs to get done.
  3. Motivation:  There are times when the motivation for the goal is not clear.  When that happens, the likelihood of giving up on the goal is much higher.  Motivation is the spicy part of a SWAG goal.  It is the intent and fundamental reason why you want to pursue a goal.  A goal is much more likely to get accomplished when intent and motivation are clear and the goals fits within the overall goals and dreams you have for your life.  If you find your motivation waning, take a look at the reason you set the goal and see if anything has changed.  If it has, it’s time to make adjustments to the goal.

Because goals need to be tended to, it’s important to make time each week to review your progress, identify any challenges and find way to either adjust the goal or make changes to help you stay on track.  Make sure you take in account all the other things that are happening in your life so that you can create steps that will fit rather than work against your other priorities.
The easy part is setting a goal.  Once it’s set, online we’re excited to get started and we go at it like there’s nothing else in the world.  Then reality hits, life gets in the way and the momentum stops.  Giving up is an option, but one that rarely feels good.  More often than not, the reasons we give up on a goal have more to do with time, the size of the goal and motivation for the goal.

  1. Time: Often we create great goals but forget to build in time each day to actually get them done.  We lead busy lives and it’s easy to lose track of our goals in the “busy-ness” of everyday priorities.
  2. Size: At the beginning of the year when we set New Year’s resolutions, we’re pretty motivated to do what needs to be done to achieve the resolution.  But we all know what happens a few weeks later.  Goals are the same way.  When they are too big or ambitious, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and to let them fizzle out.  To ensure success, break the goals down into steps that can be managed within the list of all other priorities that needs to get done.
  3. Motivation:  There are times when the motivation for the goal is not clear.  When that happens, the likelihood of giving up on the goal is much higher.  Motivation is the spicy part of a SWAG goal.  It is the intent and fundamental reason why you want to pursue a goal.  A goal is much more likely to get accomplished when intent and motivation are clear and the goals fits within the overall goals and dreams you have for your life.  If you find your motivation waning, take a look at the reason you set the goal and see if anything has changed.  If it has, it’s time to make adjustments to the goal.

Because goals need to be tended to, it’s important to make time each week to review your progress, identify any challenges and find way to either adjust the goal or make changes to help you stay on track.  Make sure you take in account all the other things that are happening in your life so that you can create steps that will fit rather than work against your other priorities.
Wait a minute! Leaders are supposed to give feedback to their employees, here not the other way around. This turns the concept of feedback on its head. There’s no doubt, viagra order it is a very uncomfortable notion for many leaders.  But having your employees give you constructive feedback is one of the most powerful ways to engage them and to develop as a leader. Leaders who are brave enough to ask their employees for feedback send a strong message of trust and mutual respect, not to mention a willingness to be vulnerable. When the employee and the leader are on equal footing, where titles don’t matter and meaningful conversation happens, you create incredible moments. So let your employees know that you want to grow as a leader and that they are in the best position to give you the feedback you need to continue to develop your leadership skills. It is a humbling experience, one that is rich and engaging for both the leader and the employee. It is the purest form of authentic leadership. 
It’s easy to become complacent in the face of routine and uninspiring tasks, buy which, sale in turn, prostate can lead to bad habits and lower productivity over time.  Routine often leads to boredom and kills creativity.  One way to ensure the creative juices will continue to flow abundantly is to keep learning and questioning.  Sharing tips, techniques and best practices about your industry and your work is a great way to spark new conversations that can lead to changes and ultimately lead to improvement and increased productivity. It also helps to change old perspectives and keep ideas fresh. Draw up a list of ideas from articles, blogs, news and journals. Task each employee to find out more information about the topic and ask one of your employees to present the information at your next team meeting. Make learning a standing agenda item and let your employees amaze you with the fresh and valuable information they bring to the table.  Not only will creativity soar, you’ll also have a built in learning process for yourself and your employees.

Written by

Dianne Gaudet is a certified Coach who is passionate about helping her clients manage the dynamics of continual life transitions as they reach new heights of personal and professional success. Helping Boomers create rich and inspired lifestyle plans for the retirement life they want is one of her greatest joys. Dianne is the author of a new book, If There Are No Limits... A guide to living with passion, purpose and possibilities. She is also a motivational speaker, teacher and world traveller.